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TOWN 
OF 

CHELMSFORD 



Annual Report 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1993 



(Y)W 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 

Location 

County 

Land Area 

Population 1993 

Assessed Valuation Rate for 1993 . . 

Tax Rate 

United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Board of Health 

Building Department 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans' Agent 



f>e-r 
7<-f 
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Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 

on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles 

from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 

from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

32,035 

$2,125,696,827 (Real Estate) 

$48,336,128 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $16.26 

($16.00 Residential-$17.08 Commercial) 

Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m.— 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m.— 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m.— 3:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Thursday 1:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. —8:00 p.m. 
Thursday-Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1:00 p.m. — 6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday. . . .9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m.— 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m.— 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

'[Except June, July & August] 



MEETINGS 

First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
Third Monday in October 
7:00 p.m.— Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. -Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m.-2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m.-lst & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m.-lst Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m.-lst Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 

McCarthy Middle Sch. 
McCarthy Middle Sch. 
Town Offices 
Parker School 

Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

Accounting 250-5215 

Assessors 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

(8:30-2:30) 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

(Yard Sales & Bldg. Permits) 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Community Teamwork 459-0551 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

(8:30-2:30) 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5265 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department . 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

High School 251-8729 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Mass. Electric Co 683-9511 

Planning Board Clerk 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

(9:00-2:00) 

Registry of Deeds (Lowell) 458-8474 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 459-9397 

School Administration 251-4981 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 251-0123 

Water Dept 256-2381 

Welfare, Lowell 454-8061 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 

24-hr. Juror Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1 : Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byman School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Office Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1-202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 
Boston, MA 02116 
362 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Martin T. Meehan 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, DC 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Avenue 

Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 

Room 413G - State House 
Boston, MA 02133 
617-722-1572 

Middlesex County Commission 

Superior Courthouse 

East Cambridge, MA 02141 

617-494-4100 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
ELECTED OFFICIALS 



CEMETERY COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 

1996 James F. Dolan 

1995 Gerald L. Hardy, CHMN 

1994 Jean R. McCaffrey *repl. E. Olsen 
*Everett V. Olsen *resigned 8/93 

CONSTABLE - 3 Yr Term 

1995 William E. Spence 

BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 Yr Term 

1995 Paul J. Canniff, VCHMN 

1994 Paul E. McCarthy^ CHMM 
1994* Peter Dulchinos, CLERK repl. 

*Unexp. 2 year term-exp. 1996 
Mark W. Gauthier resigned 10/93 

HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 Yr Term 
1998 Robert L. Hughes 
1998 Pamela Turnbull 

(Governor Appointed) 

1997 Lynn M. Marcella 

1996 William P. Keohane 

1995 Ruth Delaney 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Elizabeth A. McCarthy, CHMN 
1996 D. Lorraine Lambert, VCHMN 
1996 Lynda Reid Warren 

1995 Susan Koeckhoven 

1995 Sarah L. Warner 
1994 Kay Roberts, SEC 

1994 Nancy Knight 

MODERATOR - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Dennis E. McHugh 

PLANNING BOARD - 3 Yr Term 
1996 Eugene E. Gilet, CLK 
1996 Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

1995 James M. Creegan 
1995 John F. McCarthy 

1994 Christine A. Gleason, CHMN 
1994 Kim J. MacKenzie, VCHMN 
1994 James P. Good 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Judith B. Mallette 
1996 Mary E. Frantz, SEC 
1995 A. Olsson, VCMM 

1995 Wendy Marcks 

1994 Barbara H. Ward, CHMN 

SELECTMEN - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Robert P. Joyce, CLK 

1995 Jeffrey A. Brem 

1995 Peter V. Lawlor, VCHMN 
1994 William R. Logan 

1994 Richard E. DeFreitas, CHMN 

SEWER COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Thomas E. Moran 

1996 Richard J. Day, VCHMN 

1995 John P. Emerson, Jr., CHMN 
1995 Barry B. Balan 

1994 George Abely, CLK 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Bernard Meyler Resigned 5/93 
Jean D. Sullivan 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips 

Bruce Symmes 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 

DPW DIRECTOR 

James E. Pearson 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Dwight M. Hayward, CHMN 

Beverly A. Koltookian 

Harold I. Matzkin 

John E. Morrison 

Michael McCall 

Charles A. Piper 

Barbara Skaar 

Cheryl Boss Resigned 

Myra Silver Resigned 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

FIRE CHIEF 

Robert L. Hughes Retired 6/93 

ACTING FIRE CHIEF 

James Sousa 

POLICE CHIEF 

Raymond P. McKeon Retired 6/93 

ACTING POLICE CHIEF 

Armand Caron 

TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 



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10 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Front (L to R) Peter V. Lawlor, Vice Chairman; Richard E. DeFreitas, Chairman. 
(Rear L to R) Robert P. Joyce, Clerk; Jeffrey A. Brem, and William R. Logan. 



11 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



This year, the Board of Selectmen lost a nine-year 
veteran as a result of the annual Town Election. Selectman 
Roger Blomgren will always be remembered as a Selectman 
who meticulously did his homework on the critical issues 
that faced the Town during his three terms in office. The 
remaining members of the board welcomed Robert P. 
Joyce as the newest freshman member. This was the first 
year that all of the members of the Board were elected after 
the implementation of the "new" charter adopted in 1989. 
As a result, all of the Selectmen were still serving in their 
first term. 

The Board reorganized after the Election and elected 
Richard E. DeFreitas, Chairman, Peter V. Lawlor, Vice 
Chairman, and Robert P. Joyce, Clerk. Jeffery A. Brem 
and William R. Logan held the fourth and fifth seats 
respectively. 

The new board announced its intention to work 
diligently in resolving the issues that it was about to face. 
Many issues to come before the Board this year were of 
major significance. But, unlike prior years, this Board 
initiated the Sub-Committee approach to dig beneath the 
surface of these issue and malce recommendations to the 
entire Board prior to taking any action. This Sub- 
Committee approach made the Board very visible and 
created a working partnership with the Town Manager in 
approaching each issue and its course of action. The result 
was a greater sense of accountability for both the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen. 

The first Sub-Committee was formed to find a 
replacement for Bernard Meyler, Town Accountant who 
resigned to accept another position out of Town. The 
Board subsequently appointed Jean Sullivan to the position 
of Town Accountant. Jean has been outstanding and has 
returned a sense of stability to that office. 

As the year progressed, the Early Retirement 
program created a multitude of vacancies in both the Police 
and Fire Departments., including their Chiefs. This led to 
a reorganization of these Departments into a new Public 
Safety Consolidated Department. 



12 



Two distinct Sub-Committees were created to address this 
major Reorganization. First, Selectman Logan and 
Selectman Lawlor served on the Public Safety Sub- 
Committee which recommended the plan. The Second 
Sub-Committee consisted of Selectman Brem and 
Selectman Joyce who worked with the Town Manager to 
fill the new Public Safety Director's position. 

Many other critical issues were addressed by the 
Board, such as Water District Consolidation and the recall 
of the Center School., both of which were difficult issues. 
The Board also continued to address Long Term Planning 
and developed a Mission Statement for the Town or 
Chelmsford., a critical step into the future. 

During the year the Board met with the Finance 
Committee and School Committee to discuss financial 
issues. And., for the second year in succession, the Board 
met with the department heads to promote better 
understanding of each department's concerns. 

The Board also became involved in several State and 
Federal issues which would directly impact the Town. 
Cooperation with Senator Hicks, Representative Cleven 
and Congressman Meehan enabled the Board to continue 
monitoring ongoing legislation. We appreciate their 
support. 

On behalf of the residents of the Town of 
Chelmsford, the Board of Selectmen would like to, once 
again, thank those townspeople who offer their time and 
energy on the different elected and appointed boards. We 
would also like to recognize the efforts put forth by 
employees throughout the Town., their dedication and 
commitment are meritorious. 

Finally, many thanks to our very patient and very 
helpful staff of Judy Carter, Marian Currier, Mary Casali 
and Jeanne Parziale. Their understanding and diligence are 
must appreciated. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Chairman 
Peter V. Lawlor, Vice Chairman 
Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 
Jeffrey A. Brem 
William R. Logan 



13 



TOWN MANAGER 



In 1993 the Town of Chelmsford continued to 
recover from the unstable fiscal period that occurred in the 
late 1980's through 1990. As such we were able to proceed 
with reinstating and expanding various programs through a 
strategy of rights izing our operations. It is imperative that 
we continue to exercise prudence in our management of the 
Town in order to provide the array of governmental 
services that the citizenry expect at a cost that the people of 
the Town can afford. 

While we have weathered the worst of the economic 
storms during the recent recession we continue to face 
challenges and problems. The single greatest issue that will 
require our attention appears to oe the adequacy of our 
school budget in light of demands caused by the 
Massachusetts Educational Reform Act and the growing 
student population. Additionally, the Town has a number 
of large facility and infrastructure needs that require our 
focus and attention. The sewer project continues to be a 
priority of many residents and now accounts for 
approximately 10% of all tax bills. We have also identified 
a need for an expanded Library facility as well as a new 
centrally located public safety facility. Other issues on the 
horizon include a new Public Works facility and demands 
for a recreation/community service center. 

In order to meet the needs of the future we must 
build upon the progress that we have made over the past 
several years in controlling costs. This progress has been 
accomplished through restructurings, firm contract 
negotiations and competitive procurement practices. These 
actions need to continue. 

The FY94 Budget that was passed in FY93 sought 
to address the needs of schools and public safety through 
the re-opening of the West fire station. The budget did not 
provide for any lay-offs or service reductions and was 
balanced without any Prop. 2 1/2 overrrides or increases in 
fees. 



14 



In 1993 the Town implemented an early retirement 
program which attracted nearly forty long time employees. 
We nave appreciated their efforts over the years. We 
utilized the opportunity of these retirements to eliminate 
positions, restructure and bring on less expensive 
employees. The area experiencing the greatest impact of 
early retirements was public safety in which we lost both 
Chiefs, two Deputy Chiefs, two of our three Police 
Captains, and seven firefighters. These retirements have 
allowed us to proceed with implementing a Public Safety 
consolidation that will improve services through increased 
cooperation and provide cost savings that should exceed 
$25D,000 per year. While controversial in its acceptance, I 
am confident that this new structure will serve the long 
term interests of the Town. 

Public Safety has also been our focus for several 
other initiatives including five new police officers and 
seven new firefighters, preparatory work towards bringing 
the ambulance service in-house, and implementing a 1978 
recommendation of removing the Police Chief from 
Massachusetts Civil Service. 

In 1993 we also saw the Town continue its efforts 
towards computerization with primary efforts in finance and 
public safety. This automation should result in more 
efficiency in our operations and less costs. 

Our efforts in economic development continue with 
more space being filled in our industrial areas as well as 
new retail establishments. These businesses create jobs and 
taxes and will contribute to commercial property values that 
will shift the tax burden away from the residential sector. 

The outlook for 1994 includes continued efforts at 
automation and economic development. The direct and 
indirect benefits of such efforts will improve our operations 
and overall financial condition. We will also continue our 
focus on Public Safety through implementation of our 
restructuring and exploring alternative service delivery 
mechanisms. We will also be continuing our work in 



15 



strategic planning for the Town looking at our operational, 
structural and facility goals for the future. I am confident 
that we have the ability to meet the challenges that lie 
ahead. 

With 1993 now behind us and 1994 upon us. I want 
to take this opportunity to thank the many qualified and 
committed employees and volunteers that give so much to 
the Town. In particular I want to thank the staff of 
outstanding individuals who work in the Executive Office 
including Judy Carter, Mary Casali, Marian Currier and 
Jeanne Parziale. I also want to thank the Board of 
Selectmen for their support and direction over the past 
twelve months including Richard DeFreitas, Peter Lawlor, 
Robert Joyce, Jeffrey Brem and William Logan as well as 
Roger Blomgren. 

Finally, I want to thank the citizens of Chelmsford 
for the opportunity to serve the Town as its Manager. I 
will continue to work to bring financial stability and quality 
to our municipal government. 

Sincerely, 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Town Manager 



16 



TOWN CLERK 



Mary E. St.Hilaire,CMC,CMMC 
Town Clerk 





Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Assistant Town Clerk 




Elizabeth K. Ferreira 




Janet M. Hart 


Sporting Licenses 
1096 


Dog Licenses 
2739 


Kennel Licenses 


Intentions 


9 


218 


Birth Inc. 
364 


Deaths Marriages 
248 218 



The Town Clerk's Office Staff has accomplished many 
tasks in 1993. After 1992 being a heavy election year 1993 
was a year of much needed catch up. A new part-time 30 
hour a week position was reinstated. The added personnel 
has enabled many of the hand written/typed records to be 
transferred to various computer based programs. All daily 
receipts and dog licenses are now logged on and printed out 
via a custom computer program that was designed with 
tremendous input from the staff. Due to the program being 
extremely user friendly, various surrounding Town Clerk's 
have expressed much interest as a future endeavor. 

One of the main functions of the Town Clerk's Office 
is that of keeper of records. Different records are also now 
being maintained and issued with ease due to the use of 
computer programs. 

(NOTE: Any and all Election/Town Meeting results/minutes 
can be found starting on page 122.) 

17 



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18 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members: 

Paul F. McCarthy Chairman 
Paul J. Canniff, vice-chairman 
Mark W. Gauthier, Clerk 
Peter Dulchinos 

Health Department Personnel: 

Richard J. L)ay, Director of Public Health 
John P. Emerson, Asst. Director/Health Inspector 
Diana L. Wright, Departmental Assistant 
Judith Dunigan, R.N., Town Nurse 
Eric P. Kaplan, M.D., Town Physician 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1993 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement 
Program continued its effort to clean up our waterways. 
The Board of Health, with the advent of a central sewer 
system in the Town of Chelmsford, is now embarking on 
certain enforcement activities to insure compliance with 
local by-laws which will insure a safe water supply. Dye 
testing, water sampling and issuance of septic system 
permits will continue4n^alHhe non-sewered areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed 
below: 

Percolation Tests-53 $ 2,650 

Deep Tests-129 6,450 

Sewage Repair Permits-50 .1,250 

Sewage Construction Permits-49 2,450 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 19.165 

During 1993 five inspections were made at existing 
day care centers; Two-hundred one inspections were made 
for Chapter II Housing; eight school inspections; five- 
hundred ninety complaints received and checked; Camp 
Paul inspections; thirty bathing beaches inspections; five 
International Certificates of Vaccination, restaurant and 
retail food store inspections, one-hundred thirty 
establishments in town inspected twice a year. 



19 



Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater Program 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was 
reappointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator 
to enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for this town. 

The Board of Health held two Household Hazardous 
Waste Collection Days this year which were held on May 
1, 1993 and November 6, 1993. We properly disposed of 
the following quantities of materials: 

1. 61 barrels of Hazardous Materials 

2. 1 ,500+ Gallons of Automotive Waste Oil 

3. 130 Car Batteries 

New Regulations for the Protection of the Public Health 

1993 was another productive year for the Board of 
Health. During this time frame the Board of Health 
implemented, initiated or upgraded regulations to control 
the area "Governing The Practice of Massage/Muscular 
Therapy". 

Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed 
during 1993 for the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health: 



Hepatitis A 


1 


Hepatitis B 


3 


Salmonella 


14 


Campylobacter Enteritis 
Giardiasis 


8 


13 


Tuberculosis Control Program* 


15 


E. Coli 


1 


Pertussis 


1 


Meningitis 
Shigellosis 


4 


2 



* Referrals received form the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and 
those persons whose employment require certification of 
freedom from that disease is another responsibility of the 
Town Nurse. One-hundred ninety-nine Mantoux (TB) tests 
were given to town residents for pre-employement and to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 

20 



Home visits and telephone calls are made to families of 
active and some inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic 
basis to insure understanding of the illness and that 
adequate medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous 
medical records are kept and updated on residents who 
have a positive (TB) Mantoux test and are receiving 
medication prophylactically and being following 
radiologically at the Lowell Chest Program and Middlesex 
TB Clinic. When necessary, TB testing is done at places of 
business if employees are exposed to an active case of TB. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this 
year. One-hundred forty-six persons were immunized with 
pneumonia vaccine and one-thousand three-hundred sixty- 
rive persons were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. 
Additional doses were given to nursing homes, school 
nurses for staff, nine home visits were made to 
handicapped or house-bound residents and fifty doses to 
McFarhn Manor and Chelmsford Arms residents. A total 
of one-thousand nine-hundred nineteen doses of flu vaccine 
were administered in town. 

Two-hundred thirteen immunizations were 

administered to adults and students in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Immunizations Laws and prophylactically to 
residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the 
first Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the 
Board of Health, Town Offices. Four hundred forty-six 
residents attended the screenings. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents 
several times during the year. A nominal fee was charged 
and the dates were announced in the newspapers several 
weeks prior to the screening. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers lead paint testing for 
children between the ages of nine months and six years. 
Residents may call the Health Department at 250-5243 and 
make an appointment with the nurse. Sixty-nine children 
were screened for lead paint. 



21 



Other screenings offered by the Health Department 
include Diabetes and Mammography. Dates of these 
programs will be advertised in advance. 

A Health Fair will be held in conjunction with 
Westford every other year, finances permitting. This 
year's Health Pair is in Chelmsford, Senior Center, June 
11, 1994 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. All residents eighteen 
years and older are welcome. 



22 



CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



The Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project 
provides its services to twenty five cities and towns 
throughout Middlesex and Worcester Counties. 

The project is headquartered in a modern facility 
located at 111 Otis Street, Northboro, MA. Tours can be 
arranged by calling the office in advance. 

The project continues to utilize an Integrated Pest 
Management approach to mosquito control. This type of a 
program blends several methods and techniques with 
expertise, experience, and scientific research to provide the 
member communities with modern environmentally sound, 
cost effective mosquito control. 

One of our goals this past year was to increase our 
public education efforts. We instituted a Mosquito 
Awareness Program aimed towards elementary school 
children and offered the program to all schools within the 
project. The response was tremendous. We were able to 
meet with many children who learned a great deal about 
mosquito biology, mosquito habitat, and what they and 
their families can do to prevent mosquitoes from breeding 
around their homes. the program includes a slide talk 
show, handouts and coloring books, samples of live 
mosquito larvae, and the opportunity for students and 
teachers to ask questions and meet members of our staff. 

Due to the response from students, teachers and 
school administrators this program will again be offered to 
member communities in the spring of 1994. 

The projects' Water Management Programs continue 
to show positive results. By cleaning clogged and 
overgrown waterways, mosquito breeding is reduced, 
wetlands are restored, and water quality is improved. 

Areas were mosquito larvae are found are treated 
with BTi mosquito larvicide to prevent their emergence. 
We encourage the public to notify us as to any areas they 
suspect could breed mosquitoes. Field crews will 
investigate all such sites and treat as needed. 



23 



The project strives to handle all mosquito problems 
with water management or larviciding but recognizes that 
there are times when adult mosquito spraying is the only 
viable solution. In such cases residential ana recreational 
areas are treated with either handheld or pick-up truck 
mounted sprayers. 

The project's surveillance program monitors adult 
mosquito and larval population density and is the backbone 
for prescribing various control techniques. 

The project's video "Working for You" is available 
to anyone interested in learning more about mosquito 
control and the services provided by the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 



Department Member: 

George LeMasurier, Assistant Town Engineer 

The Engineering Division this year spent much time 
assisting other Departments with matters relating to 
drainage, layouts, trees, grading, tax maps, etc. The 
Engineering Division reviewed fifteen projects for the 
Planning Board and inspected new construction on nine 
streets. Engineering coordinated the installation of the 
traffic lights at the intersection of Littleton Road and Hunt 
Road, prepared the traffic improvement plans and State 
applications for Vinal Square, provided technical support 
for the sidewalk improvement project, prepared the bid 
package and contract for the Middlesex Street Bridge Deck 
Repair, and provided layout and grades for handicap ramp 
behind Town Hall. Engineering also designed, prepared 
plans, and coordinated the construction of the culvert 
replacement on Deep Brook near the Southwell Fields. 

Tony Ma resigned his position as Assistant Town 
Engineer that he held for the past seven years. This year, 
Tony accomplished the difficult task of acquiring his 
Professional Engineer registration. Tony accepted a 
position in his native Hong Kong and hopes to return to the 
United States in a few years. We all wish him well in his 
future endeavors. 

George LeMasurier accepted the position of 
Assistant Town Engineer in June. George is well 
experienced in the engineering/surveying field and will be 
a valuable asset to theTown. 



25 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Department Members: 

John Long, Superintendent 
Roy Costa, Foreman 
Lawrence Ferreira, Foreman 
Marie Burns, Office 
Gary Beulieu, Operator 
Kenneth Burroughs, Laborer 
James Crotty, Driver 
Robert Dearborn, Driver 
John Ferreira, Lead Mechanic 
Dennis Greenwood, Operator 
Richard Jenson, Mechanic 
Arthur Newcomb, Operator 
Raymond Mayberry, Driver 
Joseph Erikson, Driver 
Audie Boudreau, Driver 
David Palmer, Driver 
David Eacrett .Driver 
Todd Chase, Driver 
David Irvine, Driver 
Paul Winegar, Driver 

The Highway Division maintains and improves all 
the streets, culverts, catch basins and manholes, street 
signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for approximately 200 
miles of roadway. 

Streets Resurfaced 

Boston Road - Town line to Roberts 

Concord Road - Portions 

Carlisle Street - Rt 3A to Marshall Street 

Park Road - Acton Road to Proctor 

Old Westford Road - Drum Hill to Westford Street 

High Street - Rt 27 to Robin Hill 

Trotting Road - Entire 

Conestoga Road - Entire 

Jordan Road - Entire 

Wotton Lane - Entire 

The crew reconstructed all of Westchester and 
Danforth Streets. These roads were in very poor condition 
due to improper road foundation and lack of adequate 
drainage facilities. 



26 



Handicapped ramps were installed at the town 
offices. This will facilitate the entry to the gymnasium 
which is used for voting, meetings, and recreational 
activities. 

A weir wall was built to maintain drainage at the 
Southwell Field. The structure was designea by the 
Engineering Division. The excavation, site preparation and 
backfill was completed by the Highway Department. The 
wooden handrails were constructed by resident Tony Brown 
as part of his community service requirements for his Eagle 
Scout award. 

During the winter, the Town experienced one of the 
snowiest seasons in a long time. Over seven feet of snow 
fell and was handled by the dedicated employees and hired 
contractors who often work extended periods without sleep 
in order to maintain open roads so the emergency vehicles 
could access every property. 

In June the division lost five of our more 
experienced and dedicated employees to retirement. We 
wish Foreman Bobby Loyd, Equipment Operator Walter 
McLaughlin, Driver-Laborers John Cronin and Joseph 
Oczkowski and Laborer Leslie Dukeshire a happy and 
healthy retirement. 

The division welcomed new employees David 
Palmer, David Eacrett, Todd Chase, David Irvine and Paul 
Winegar. 



27 



PARKS DIVISION 



Department Member: 

Edward Jamros, Groundskeeper 

The Parks Division, staffed by one full time 
employee, Ed Jamros, maintains all the parks and 
recreational facilities owned by the Town. This includes 
at least 20 areas such as the town commons, athletic fields, 
traffic islands, etc. Once again this year Eric Newman was 
hired as a temporary employee to assist with cutting during 
the growing seasons and with special projects. 

Special projects this year included the completing of 
the Varney Fieldnouse bathroom renovation, and the 
complete reconstruction of the Varney Field infield area 
which was substantially completed during the Fall. This 
was a joint effort of the Parks, Engineering and Highway 
Divisions. Harry Ayotte also contributed with his advice 
and baseball experience. The project is due to be 
completed in the upcoming Spring season. 

A new flagpole was installed at the East Chelmsford 
veteran's monument. The area was cleaned, scraped and 
repainted as well. 

During the off season Ed Jamros has been at work 
maintaining the equipment, painting at the Old Town Hall 
and assisting with the snow plowing effort. 



28 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DIVISION 



Department Members: 

Theodore Godfroy, Superintendent 
Patrick Murtagh, Head Custodian 
Gerald Johnson, Custodian 

The Public Buildings Division staff consists of the 
Superintendent and two custodians, Pat Murtagh and Jerry 
Johnson. This year saw a change in the Superintendent 
position as Bob Deletetsky retired after many years of 
devoted service both at the Town Offices and the School 
Department. We wish Bob a long, healthy retirement in 
Florida. Ted Godfroy was hired as Superintendent. Ted 
brings his many years of experience to the Town and his 
creativity and energy have oeen evident in the projects 
undertaken in the building. 

This year's special projects included the installation 
of a new "used" emergency generator in the basement of 
the Town Offices. This is especially important since the 
building is the control center of the Civil Defense and has 
been utilized in actual emergency situations several times in 
recent years. 

Other projects such as patching and painting have 
utilized the new senior citizen program administered by 
Marty Walsh of the Senior Center. 



29 



SEWER DIVISION 

Department Members: 

James Casparro, Inspector 

Joseph Witts, Mechanic 

Evelyn Newman, Department Assistant 

Jacqueline Sheehy, Principal Clerk 

Gail Loiselle, Clerk 

Michael Vosnakis, Technician 

The Sewer Division continued to expand again this 
year. The addition of the Lord Road, Vincent Road, 
Western Avenue, and Janet Road Pumping Stations brings 
the total number of pumping stations to twelve. On-line 
sewer users have increased by 459 over the past year for a 
total of almost 3,000. 

With new sewer construction continuing to expand 
into more areas of the Town, the office staff keeps 
extremely busy preparing and processing the Sewer 
Betterment Assessments, Sewer User bills, the Sewer 
Commission agendas, meeting minutes, contracts and 
general correspondence. 

An equipment preventative maintenance program is 
being implemented in order to minimize equipment failure 
and down time. With the addition of a maintenance 
technician to the staff, a much needed service vehicle was 
added to the Sewer Division. A plow setup was added to 
the new truck in order to assist the Hignway Division 
during snow emergencies. 

Thanks go to the three Water Districts for their 
cooperation with water meter readings and backflow 

Srevention device testing, and to the Fire and Police 
>epartments for monitoring pumping stations' alarms. 
Special thanks go to the Sewer Commission for their 
cooperation throughout the year. 

I would like to thank the clerical staff for their 
cooperation and their flexibility. Finally, I would like to 
thank all the employees of the Department of Public Works 
who don't often get recognition but are the individuals who 
are on the job during snowstorms, flooding incidents, 
sewer backups, windstorms, etc., maintaining the 
emergency accesses and the Town's infrastructure. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Director, Town Engineer 

30 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report to 
the citizens of Chelmsford some major accomplishments of 
1993. 

Mr. Frank Peterson retired as Superintendent of 
Cemeteries after serving the Town for over six years. The 
Commission would like to recognize Mr. Peterson for the 
significant strides made in the development of new burial 
space and for the computerization of records that occurred 
under his leadership. He has been succeeded by John 
Sousa, Jr. 

The Commission wishes to express its appreciation 
to Dr. Everett Olsen for the many contributions he made as 
a member of the Cemetery Commission for nearly 
seventeen years. 

The number of interments reached a record high of 
149, making 1993 the busiest year in the history of the 
ChelmsforaCemeteries. Cremation interments totaled 22 
for the year and accounted for 15% of total interments. 
There were 78 lots sold during the year. There were two 
incidents of vandalism in the cemeteries. 

Receipts turned over to the Town in FY 1993 
include: 

Sale of Graves & Lots $14,205 

Interments & Other Fees $50,365 

Foundation Installations $15.673 

TOTAL $80;243 

In the historical section of West Chelmsford 
Cemetery, all trees were pruned and a project was 
undertaken to improve storm drainage. 

The Commission would like to express its gratitude 
to Mrs. Jane Drury for her continuing work on the 
completion of an accurate inventory of historical 
gravestones in the cemeteries. By using information 
collected from this project and working in cooperation with 
Mrs. Drury, the Cemetery staff was able to restore four 
vandalized monuments from the early 1820's to their 
proper locations in Heart Pond Cemetery. 



31 



Goals for 1994 include: 

o Continue the restoration of vandalized historical 
monuments in Forefathers and Riverside Cemeteries. 

o Repair all broken components of the Pine Ridge pump 
house and irrigation systems. 

o Complete the numbering of burial lots in Section I, Pine 
Ridge Cemetery. This area will provide space for over 
1,700 graves when opened in 1994. 

The Commission also expresses its thanks to our 
cemetery staff for providing compassionate and 
professional service to the townspeople at their most 
sensitive time of need. 



Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa, Jr., Superintendent 
Jorge Caires, Working Foreman 
Kenneth Frazier, Backhoe Operator 
Patrick Caires, Truck Driver 
Eileen Johnson P.T. Clerk 
Jose Teixeira, Seasonal Landscaper 



Respectfully Submitted, 



John Sousa, Jr. 

Superintendent of Cemeteries and 

Secretary to the Commission 



32 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 



Department Members: 

Jean Sullivan, Town Accountant 
Re nee Young, Assistant Town Accountant 
Patricia Tucker Principal Clerk 
Christine Dowa, Payroll Coordinator 

In FY 1993 Mary Villare, Assistant Town 
Accountant, retired from our office after 21 years of 
dedicated service. Renee Young replaced Mary and was 
promoted to the position of Assistant Town Accountant. 
Christine Dowd was promoted to Payroll Coordinator 
replacing Renee Young. 

In the upcoming year, an in-house computer system 
will be introduced with the implementation of the general 
ledger, accounts payable and cash receipts functions. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jean Sullivan 
Town Accountant 



33 



ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT 



Board Members: 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A., Chairman 
Bruce A. Symmes, CM. A., R.M.A., M.A.A 
Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 

Eric R. Josephson, M.A.A. , Assistant Assessor 
Nancy L. Maher, Administrative Assistant 
Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 
Elaine Myers, Principal Clerk 

The office has had a change in personnel this year. 
Marie Ronan who has been with the Assessors Office since 
1978 retire in June. Her position was not filled, instead we 
have hired an assistant assessor, Eric Josephson who will be 
helping the board with the next triennial recertification. 
The Assessors will be doing most of the recertification, 
using a minimal of outside help. With the added help of 
the new assistant, plus computer ability, we have now 
achieved what we sought to do over the last few years, 
which is to do the revaluation work in-house. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Board of Assessors 



34 



DATA PROCESSING 



Fiscal Year 1993 has been a busy one for the Data 
Processing Department. The Accounting/Town, 

IBM/UNIX system has finally been installed and is used by 
the Accounting, Data Processing and Treasurer s 
Department. The Novell network has increased to 
approximately 40 users that can use this system and 
averages 30 users a day on the system. 

The Police/Fire Department's computer was also 
installed this year into the Police Department. The Fire 
Department is expected to be installed July /August of 1994, 
and have full functionality as does the Police Department 
by September /October of 1994. 

The Assessor's Department database program 
(MITAS-Real Property) was upgraded to work with the 
current VISION (Personal Property) program. This 
package will now enable the Novell system users to use the 
full capacity of memory installed. 

FY95 goals include the continuing upgrade to the 
Novell System. The Fire Departments installation and 
connection to the Police/Fire System. The Police/Fire 
System connection to the Town Hall Offices via the 
Accounting/Town's Unix System. Phase II of the 
Accounting/Town's Unix system. In-house training in 
Lotus will also be available starting in FY95. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Judy Dunn 

Data Processing Coordinator 



35 



TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 



Department Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, Finance Director 

Carol R. Lambert, Assistant Treasurer 

Bettie A. Osborne, Departmental Assistant 

Judith A. Olsson, Part-time Legal Clerk 

Joan L. Garland, Data Processing Clerk 

Anna M. Griffin, Accounts Payaole/Receivale Clerk 

This past year saw a tremendous increase in the 
number of municipal liens issued. This was due to home- 
owners refinancing because of low mortgage rates. A new 
computer program was installed to meet this demand. 

We have successfully foreclosed on some lots of 
land for unpaid taxes. 

We suspended numerous drivers licenses for failure 
to pay excise taxes. 

With the high number of bankruptcies being filed all 
uncollected funds must be aggressively sought out and the 
towns interest secured with liens. I will devote much of 
my time and effort to reducing unpaid accounts to a bear 
minimum. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Charles F. Mansfield 
Finance Director 



36 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The Fire Department has had a fine year in 1993 
with many improvements and changes. 

One that must be viewed as bittersweet is the 
retirement of Chief Robert L. Hughes, Deputy Charles S. 
Galloway and Firefighters Robert A. Bennett, Paul D. 
Henderson, Peter T. Wetherbee, Richard P. O'Neil, James 
P. Flaherty, Terrace A. Goode and Richard L. Grennon. 
We view this change with joy because they have received 
the recognition and rewards aue them for their service to 
our community, yet we are saddened to lose the skills that 
they brought to our organization each day. We will deeply 
miss their friendship and brotherhood. 

We celebrate our eight new Firefighers Donald E. 
Peterson, Gary Ryan, Kevin O'Brien, Michael Donoghue, 
George E. Ryan, Jr., Kevin M. Sheehy, Martin 
Boermeester, Jr., Leo F. Manley and our eight new 
dispatchers David DeFreitas, Richard Demers, William 
Vaughan, Richard Marchand, Michael Cassella, Edward 
Overn, James P. Flaherty, Terrace A. Goode and welcome 
them to a rewarding career. 

Engine 3 in West Chelmsford was opened without 
increasing our budget. I am proud of the cooperation and 
effort that our Officers and Firefighters put forth to bring 
about the necessary changes in our procedures to make this 
happen. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board 
of Selectmen, all Town Employees, and the community in 
general for their help and cooperation this past year. 

I invite you to join us and our new Chief John E. 
Parow in reorganizing and improving our organization to 
best provide the services that you want, need and should 
have. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

James A. Sousa 
Acting Fire Chief 



37 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 

Acting Chief James A. Sousa 

Deputy Chief 

Acting Deputy Wm Michael Burke 



Captains 



James M. Spinney 
James P. Boermeester 
Walter F. Adley 



Martin Boermeester 
William F. Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
John Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
David Clancy 
Kevin Clarke 
MarkF. Conlin 
James F. Curran 
William Curran 
William Dalton 
John Depalma 
Michael Donoghue 
Bruce Donovan 
Donald Drew 
James J. Durkin 
Jesse Foster 
Ernest Frobese 
William Hadley 
Paul D. Hayes 
Henry A. Houle 
William Jamer 
Peter Johnson 
Dennis Keohane 



Charles A. Schramm 
Michael F. Curran 
David W. Hadley 



Firefighters 



William Keohane 
Raymond R. Kydd 
Emil Magiera 
Leo F. Manley 
Leo Martin 
Michael McTeague 
Leslie Merrill 
Richard Miller 
Edward J. Nolet 
Kevin O'Brien 
Donald E. Peterson 
Daniel T. Reid 
James F. Reid 
John E. Reid 
Michael Ridlon 
Arthur Rivard 
John Robinson 
Gary Ryan 
George E. Ryan 
Kevin M. Sheehy 
Joseph Spinazola 
Brian Stanton 
J. Daniel Ubele 
Dennis Vargeletis 



Principal Clerk 

Martha A. DeSaulnier 

Senior Clerk 

Patricia A. Britton 

Mechanic 

James Keeley 

Civilian Dispatchers 

David DeFreitas Michael Cassella 

Richard Demers Edward Overn 

William Vaughan James P. Flaherty 

Richard Marchand Terrance A. Goode 



38 



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39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information 
and review the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1993. 

At the present time, the Department is made up of 
39 permanent Officers. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Armand J. Caron 

LIEUTENANTS 

Raymond G. McCusker Francis X. Roark 

SERGEANTS 

Steven A. Burns James F. Murphy 

Paul E. Cooper Timothy F. O'Connor 

J. Ronald Gamache John O. Walsh 

DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTOR 
LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

INSPECTORS 

James T. Finnegan Brian F. Mullen 

Peter C. McGeown 

COMMUNITY SERVICES AND SAFETY OFFICERS 

Patrick W. Daley 

PATROL OFFICERS 

Richard A. Adams Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

Thomas J. Daly, Jr. David A. O'Brien 

Bruce A^ Darwin John E. Redican 

John J. Donovan Paul E. Richardson 

Kenneth R. Duane Chandler J. Robinson 

Jared S. Finnegan E. Michael Rooney 

Gail F. Hunter Michael W. Stott 

Francis P. Kelly Francis P. Teehan 

Martin W. Krikorian Robert J. Trudel 

Roland E. Linstad Scott R. Ubele 

Russell H. Linstad William R. Walsh 

David F. MacKenzie Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 
John C. McGeown 



40 



FULL-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Gloria Armstrong Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. 

Barbara J. Ducharme Frank C. Lane 

PART-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Mary Jo Fitton Colin C. Spence 

Laura Raffaelo 

PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Marie K. DiRocco Mary Jane Grant 

Donn Fox 

SENIOR CLERK 

Elizabeth A. Ripaldi 

FULL-TIME TEMPORARY CLERK 

Margaret E. Greenhalgh 

MATRONS 

Mary Jo Fitton Carol Ann Tabor 

Cynthia Katsikas 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1993 1993 

Photocopying Machines $ 3,107.00 3,047.50 

Firearms Permits 3,044.00 3,255.00 

Bicycle Registrations 4.50 5.00 

Firearms Identification Cards 366.00 486.00 

Court Fines Revenue 41,186.00 28,414.00 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 91,903.30 79,322.50 

Photographs 492.00 580.00 

Police Details - Service Charge 32,908.41 51,507.87 



41 



False Alarm Fees 

Parking Fines 

Restitution 

Total Receipts Returned 
To The Town: 



5,875.00 5,225.00 

7,730.00 9,980.00 

1,265.00 1,245.00 

$187,881.21 $183,067.87 



ARRESTS 


1992 


1993 


Crimes Against Persons 


62 


84 


Crimes Against Property 


202 


145 


Crimes Against Public Order 


183 


182 


DISPOSITION OF CASES 
1992 


1993 


Fines 


45 


40 


Placed on Probation 


24 


32 


Suspended Sentence/Placed on File 


26 


26 


Placed on File 


6 


6 


Not Guilty Finding 


10 


2 


Dismissed with Probable Cause 


16 


44 


Court Costs & Continued Without 
Finding 


6 


4 


Committed to Youth Services 
Board 


3 


1 


Committed to M.C.I. Cedar 
Junction 


2 


1 


Committed to M.C.I. Concord 





1 



42 



Committed to M.C.I. Framingham 





3 


Committed to House of Correction, 
Billerica 


56 


23 


Turned Over to Other Courts/ 
Police Departments 


209 


93 


Cases Pending & Continued 
In Court 


76 


124 


Placed in Alcohol Safety 
Program (ASAP) 


23 


11 


MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 




Calls Answered by Cruisers 


18,633 


19,773 


Summons Served 


553 


467 


Licenses Suspended/Revoked 


1,176 


941 


Accidents Reports 


1,153 


1,100 


Fatal Accidents 


2 


8 


Personal Injury Accidents 


302 


336 


Mileage of Cruisers 


426,447 


432,700 


Station Lockups 


502 


411 


Citations Issued 


2,365 


1,629 


Parking Violations Issued 


417 


506 


Doors/Windows Found Open 


68 


74 


Protective Custody 


53 


50 


Restraining Orders Served 


84 


107 



False Alarms Responded to 

by Cruisers 1,119 1,073 



43 



RETIREMENTS 

The year 1993 was highlighted by the unprecedented 
retirement in June of not only the Police Chief, out also the 
Deputy Chief and two Captains. All took advantage of the 
early retirement bill, offered by the Commonwealth. 

Chief Raymond P. McKeon retired after 31 years of 
service to the Town, 14 of which he served as Police Chief. 
Deputy Chief James C. Greska retired after 28 years of 
service, Captain John J. Mack retired after 27 years of 
service and Captain John N. Molleur retired after 23 years 
of service. 

In addition to the above, Patrol Officer Alan N. 
Cote retired from police work to pursue a career as an 
Attorney. Sergeant Lance Cunningham transferred to the 
Lowell Police Department. 

COMPUTER SYSTEM 

The long-awaited computerization of the Police 
Department was achieved in December, allowing more 
efficient and timely access to records and statistical data. 
This computerization was funded in part by a grant of 
$20,000.00 from the Massachusetts Committee on Criminal 
Justice. 

TRAINING 

As part of the Departments' Emergency Medical 
Training Program, the entire Department was certified in 
the handling of Blood-Borne Pathogens, as required by 
OSHA. 

ALARM BY-LAW 

An alarm by-law, was passed at the fall Town 
Meeting requiring mat all business and residential property 
owners owning alarms, register annually with tn Police 
Department. This registration will enable the Police 
Department to expedite service and response when needed. 

REVENUE 

As itemized in the above chart, the Police 
Department generated total receipts of $183,067.87, which 
reverted back to the General Fund of the Town. 



44 



GOALS 

One of the main goals of the Chelmsford Police 
Department in the next 12 months, will be the centralized 
dispatch of the Police and Fire Departments. This 
centralized dispatch will set the stage tor Enhanced 911, 
which will be operational in the Fall of 1994. 



I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board 
of Selectmen, and all Town Departments for the 
cooperation they have given to the Police Department 
during the past year. I would also like to express my 
appreciation to all the members of the Police Department, 
for the professionalism and dedication exhibited during the 
past 12 months. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Chief Armand J. Caron 



45 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 



The Auxiliary Officers assisted the regular Police 
Department at numerous events such as the Memorial Day 
Parade, Flag Day Ceremonies, Veterans' Park Dedications, 
Chelmsford High School Graduation exercises, July 3rd 
and 4th festivities, Veteran's Day celebration, Halloween 
security for the schools and also Thanksgiving football 
security for the High School. The Auxiliary Officers 
assisted the regulars at numerous motor vehicle accident 
scenes as well. The Officers of the Auxiliary donated a 
total of 10,325 man hours to the Town. 

Operation property check continued. The statistics 
were: vacant house checks 3000; school checks 14,200; 
town property checks 15,500; for a total of 32,700. There 
is no question that the Auxiliary Patrol prevents the 
malicious destruction of property to these valuable Town 
buildings and resources. The Auxiliary Unit continues to 
sponsor the Law Enforcement Explorers Scout Post #370. 
Officers of the Auxiliary train these young men and women 
in traffic control, search techniques, firearms safety and 
other related law enforcement activities. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary, 
the Scouts and their families for donating so much of their 
time. Your volunteer assistance continues to make 
Chelmsford a better place to live. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager for their support the Police Chief, the 
Superior Officers and the Patrol Officers of the Police 
Department for all their assistance and support over the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 



46 



AUXILIARY ROSTER 

Director-Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



William G. Amundson 
Jeffrey A. Blodgett 
Timothy B. Bourke 
Joseph M. Eriksen 
Eric Gordon 
Richard D. Hallion 
Michael A. Houston 
David Irvine 
David M. Leo 
Peter D. LoPilato 
Steven Manning 



Erik Merrill 
Robert J. Murphy 
Robin Clark Outridge 
Robert M. Outwater 
Bradford Poole 
Ralph Roscoe 
Keven A. Ross 
Colin C. Spence 
Craig E. Walsh 
David W. Walsh 
Gary R. White 



47 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 
REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER FOR 1993 



Citizen complaints answered 1,335 

Dogs picked up and taken to pound 69 

Violation citations issued 7 

Value of citation fines $300.00 

Funds turned into the Town for boarding 

and other fees collected $545.00 

Dead animals picked up from streets 289 

Stray dogs disposed of 22 

Dogs returned to owners 47 

Animal bite reports 22 

Total miles traveled 12,573 



In the year 1993, not only the Town, but also the 
New England area experienced an epidemic of rabies in the 
raccoon population. A sample testing of an infected 
raccoon has confirmed that rabies is present in the Town. 
The epidemic has reduced the over-population of the 
raccoon species in great number. I would also like to 
remind all pet owners that the law requires, that all 
domesticated pets, cats as well as dos, be inoculated against 
rabies. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Franklin E. Warren 
Dog Officer 



48 



INSPECTIONS DEPARTMENT 

The Building Inspections Department has seen many 
transitions during 1993. There were 66 new single family 
dwellings, 3 duplexes, and 2 multi family dwellings. Most 
permits were for additions, renovations, alterations, 
remodeling, and 
tenant fit-ups. 



# 


PERMITS 
Type 


Total Fees 


590 


Building 


$104,216.10 


579 


Electrical 


$ 25,048.00 


1,350 


Plumbing & Gas 


$ 43.086.00 




Sub Total 


$172,350.10 


Plus Certificates of Inspection, 
Yard Sales, Weights & Sales, 
Signs 


$ 15.460.00 




Total 


$187,810.10 



The installation of Town sewerage has had an 
impact on the useage of buildable lots; this has been 
reflected during the last two months of 1993. We have had 
an increase of approved proposed subdivisions and/or 
cluster housing to oe started in 1994 (63 new single family 
dwellings, and 98 new single family dwellings for 
Affordable Housing). Plans have also been submitted for a 
110 unit retirement home. 

I would like to thank Elaine Casey, Senior Clerk, 
Joseph Shaw, Local Inspector, Kenneth Kleynan, Plumbing 
and Gas Inspector, and Dennis Kane, Electrical Inspector, 
for their cooperation, professionalism, and 
expertise. 



Respectfully Submitted: 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Inspector of Buildings 



49 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




Front (L to R) D. Lorraine Lambert, Vice-Chair; Elizabeth McCarthy, Chair; 
Susan Koeckhoven. Back (L to R) Nancy Knight, Treasurer; Kay Roberts; 
Secretary; Sarah Warner and Lynda Warren. 



50 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, 25 Boston Road, 
Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library, 
Newfield St. , North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees: 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Chair 
Kay Roberts, Vice-Chair 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Susan Koeckhoven, Secretary 
Nancy Knight 
Sarah Warner 
Lynda Warren 

In 1993 the Library circulated 347,563 items — an 
8.6% increase from 1992. Increase use was reflected in 
long lists for popular items, increased interlibrary 
borrowing, and reference service. For the first time in 
three years, the Adams Library and Children's House 
opened on Sunday afternoons from September through 
May. 

The Library completed a Long Range Development 
Plan as a result of a three month needs analysis by the 
Library Planning Committee to assess library needs. The 
Development Plan recommended goals for future service. 
These goals, voted and approved by the Board of Library 
Trustees in February, 1993, are: (1) to provide an 
accessible and expanded main library facility; (2) to 
improve the library collections; (3) to provide qualified and 
trained staff to support library services; (4) to improve 
community awareness of library services and needs; (5) to 
provide library hours 7 days a week. In March 1993 the 
goals were presented to the community in a town-wide 
forum on the Library sponsored by the League of Women 
Voters. 

The Town of Chelmsford purchased the property at 
10 Bartlett St. for future Library purposes. The cost of the 
property was partially offset with money from the Library 
Endowment Fund and the auction of a painting of Amos 
Adams by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait. The property which is 
contiguous with the Adams Library property makes possible 
the future expansion of the Adams Library. 



51 



Programs 

The Library sponsored Adult and Children's 
programs throughout the year. These included storytellers, 
magicians, and educational workshops for Children. The 
Children's Library and MacKay Branch participated in the 
Statewide Summer Reading Program - Sail on a Sea of 
Books. An average of 8 "storyhours" were held each 
week. A Young Writers Program was formed for Children 
in grades 5 and up. Participants enjoy guest lecturers 
speaking on the craft of writing at their monthly meetings 
and have the opportunity to be published in C.P.L. s 
Young Writers' Newsletter. 

Adult programs included a book discussion series, 
workshops on finance, gardening, genealogy, health issues, 
and AIDS. Income tax assistance was provided by a library 
volunteer. 

The MacKay Branch Library continued the Tea for 
Tuesdays (discussion) programs and its successful mystery 
writers discussion group. 

Personnel 

The Library said "good-bye" to Judith Bus wick who 
resigned as the Head of the Library Community Services 
Department, Sandra Yensen, the Head of the Reference 
Department and Nancy Vinkels, the Library's Acquisition 
Specialist. These staff members were replaced by 
Rather ine Cryan-Hicks in Community Services, by 
Nanette Eichell in Reference, and by Diane Yallabandi in 
Acquisitions. 

Volunteers 

The Library benefited throughout the year from the 
work and efforts of many volunteers. Volunteers assisted 
with storyhours, booklists, and the Organization's 
Handbook. Our volunteers typed, filed, shelved and shelf- 
read, gardened, and assisted in equipment maintenance. 
The Country Lane Garden Club sponsored a special Arbor 
Day Program for Children. 

The Friends of the Library booksale (Jaci Matzkin, 
President) was held in September. The book sale attracts 
bibliophiles from around New England. Revenues from 
the 1993 Sale broke records and provided the Library 



52 



with museum passes, new furniture for the MacKay 
Branch, funding for programming and computer 
equipment. The Friends donated $10,000 to the Library's 
Endowment Fund. 

Library Facilities 

Adams Library Building: The 1993 Library Needs 
Analysis identified major building needs of the Library. 
These include: handicapped access, space for users and 
collections, parking, heating, plumbing, and electrical 
systems. At the same time the acquisition of additional 
land at the Adams Library Site made feasible the expansion 
of the Adams Library. The Board of Library Trustees 
appointed a Library Building Committee to manage the 
project of renovation and expansion of the Adams Library. 
Margaret Marshall was voted Chair of the 15 member 
committee. Conceptual designs and cost estimates will be 
completed in the Fall of 1994. 

MacKay Branch Library: Money was appropriated to 
provide a handicap ramp and bathroom at the MacKay 
Branch Library. This project will be completed in the 
Spring of 1994 and will make the main level of the library 
wneelchair accessible. 

Goals 

In 1994, the library will continue to work and plan 
for the expansion and renovation of the Adams Library; 
improve the quality, quantity, variety, and scope of the 
library materials -including electronic information sources; 
to continue to promote the value of library services to the 
community; and to provide hours at the Adams Library and 
MacKay Branch which will meet the varying lifestyles and 
needs of residents. The Library Endowment Committee 
plans a year of special fund raising activities. 

As we look forward to new goals for 1994, special 
acknowledgment is given to the Library Staff, Board of 
Trustees, the Friends of the Library, the Library Planning 
Committee, Endowment Committee, the Library Building 
Committee, and all our library volunteers and patrons for 
making 1992 a successful year. 



53 



Statistical Reports 

Monies deposited with the Town 
Treasurer From fines, lost 



materials and fees: 


12,464 


Circulation: 


347,562 


Reference Questions: 


23,192 


Staff: 

Full Time: 

Part Time (F.T.E.): 


10 
11.4 



Departments 

Director: Mary E. Mahoney 
Children's Library: Cheryl Zani 
Head of Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Community Service: Katherine Cryan-Hicks 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Maintenance: John Reslow 
Reference: Nanette Eichell 
Technical Service: Laura Kulik 



54 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Front (L to R) Christina Egan, Student Rep.; Barbara H. Ward, Chairman; Dr. 
Richard H. Moser, Supt. of Schools. Rear (L to R) Wendy C. Marcks; Carl A. 
Olsson, Vice Chairman; Mary E. Frantz and Judith B. Mallette. 



55 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Barbara Ward has served as Chairman of the 
Chelmsford School Committee for the 1993-94 school year. 
She was supported by Mr. Carl Olsson, Vice Chairman; 
Mrs. Mary Frantz, Secretary; Mrs. Judith Mallette and 
Mrs. Wendy Marcks, Members at Large. Central 
administration for the school department has included Dr. 
Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. David 
Troughton, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and 
Instruction; Mr. Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager; 
and Mr. Bernard DiNatale, Director of Educational 
Technology. 

The work of the Chelmsford School Committee and 
Central Office Management Team over the past year has 
centered on issues on continuing reorganization of the 
school system, implementation or recent changes in State 
Law as they apply to the operation of our schools, strategic 
planning to facilitate improved educational environments 
for students, and the increasing challenge of school finance. 

The Education Reform Law of 1993 resulted in a 
number of organizational and operational changes within 
the Chelmsford School Department. Each school has 
organized a school council for the purpose of assisting the 
building principal with issues or school management. 
Councils nave been concentrating on the development of 
school improvement plans, reviewing budget decisions, 
assessing the needs of each school, and identifying 
alternatives for parent involvement. Council members 
include parents, community members, teachers and 
building principals. The goal of school councils, supported 
by the Chelmsford School Committee, is to provide an 
arena for participatory decision making. We have high 
hopes for the development of school councils and their 
ability to support school improvement initiatives. 

Council members have been instrumental in the 
development of system-wide learner outcomes as part of 
our on-going strategic planning process. Outcomes have 
been grouped into three areas: students as educated 
learners, responsible citizens, and productive workers. 



56 



The development of outcomes has been driven by our 
interest in identifying those areas of learning that will 
contribute to students' success upon graduation from 
Chelmsford High School. The identification of outcomes 
will assist administrators and staff in the development of 
curriculum and guide our long range plans for school 
improvement. 

The new Educational Foundation Formula has had 
an impact on our State Aid revenue projections for the 
Chelmsford Public Schools. The formula is designed to 
assist towns in meeting "foundation level" spending 
expectations. Aid has been categorized into various types 
depending upon the financial status of the Town; Minimum 
Aid, Foundation Aid, Overburden Aid, Equity Aid and 
School Choice Aid. While Chelmsford is targeted to 
receive an increase in State Aid for 194-95, the increase 
falls short of meeting the financial needs of our school 
system. 

Projected revenue for the School Department in 
1994-95 is approximately $26,000,000. Our proposed 
budget for next year, following several years of cutbacks 
and restructuring, is approximately $27,000,000. At the 
time of this writing, school officials are planning a budget 
that matches the available funds for next year. 

Part of the need for additional revenue is the 
continued growth of our student population. Enrollment of 
1994-95 is expected to be in excess of 5,420 students. 
During the 1993-94 school year sixth grade students have 
been reorganized for attendance at Parker and McCarthy 
Schools. In 1994-95 reorganization will continue with the 
development of four K-4 elementary schools at Harrington, 
Byam, Westlands, and South Row Schools. Parker School 
will house students from grades 5-7, and McCarthy 
students from grade 5-8. Reorganization will conclude in 
1995-96 with four K-4 elementary schools, two 5-8 middle 
schools and one 9-12 high school. 

The Chelmsford School Committee has appreciated 
the efforts of parents, staff and community members in 
educating our students at home, in school, and within our 
community. We continue to commit to the concept that our 
children are our future; we believe our entire community 
has a vested interest in the future of our schools; and we 
invite everyone to participate in the growth and 
development of our youth. 



57 



IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee wishes to extend their deep 
appreciation to the following staff members for their years 
of loyal and meritorious service and who have retired this 
past year: 



Bvam School: 

Helen Doyle 
Claire McCrady 

Harrington School: 

Ueraldine Anderson 

Hi gh School: 

William Gullage 
Betty Holmes 
Manko House 
Martha Kinneen 
Joan Merrill 
Elaine Murphy 
Nancy Ovitt 
Marilyn Welch 

McCarthy School: 

Joan Clement 
Thaddeus Dulski 
Nair Uma 
Patricia Rienstra 
Joan Sparks 
Mary Jean Wilson 

enior Center: 

lldred Donovan 

South , Row School: 

betty Jane Sknvanek 
Theima Stallard 

Svstemwide: 

Donald Butler 
Ernest Coulouras 
Robert McCrady 
Jean Piper 
Lorraine Small 

Westlands: 

Dorotnea Connolly 
Harold Gilpatrick 



if 



School Nurse 
Elementary Teacher 

Special Education Teacher 

Custodian 

Career Education Support Staff 

Food Service Staff ™ 

English Teacher 

House Secretary 

House Secretary 

Home Economics Teachers 

Food Service Manager 

Instructional Support Staff 
Social Studies Teacher 
7 ood Service Staff 
"ood Service Staff 
nstructional Support Staff 
inglish Teacher 

Food Service Cook 

School Nurse 
Library Assistant 

Attendance Counselor 
School Psychologist 
Maintenance Employee 
Food Service Secretary 
Director of Food Service 



Teacher 



Elemetary Teacl 
Head Custodian 



Submitted by: 

Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



58 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 



Chelmsford High School has experienced very 
positive growth in a variety of program areas for the 1993- 
94 school year, based upon programs created in the 1992- 
93 school year, and I would like to take this opportunity to 
provide an update as to the progress of these programs. 

The Student Assistance Program, which targets at 
risk youth who have experienced a variety of difficulties in 
school in the past, has been an outstanding success. 
Students assigned to the program since September (14) have 
shown significant improvement academically and socially, 
and their average daily attendance has improved 
dramatically. 

The new school-wide attendance policy has helped 
to increase student attendance this year by 3%, up to 9:5% 
for the first half of the year; and, the ancillary Student 
Support Program, an after school, extra-help program 
designed to reduce the number of student failures, has oeen 
equally successful, reducing the number of F's among 
student athletes, for example, from 54 to 11 during the first 
marking term. 

Learning Centers have been created in order to 
afford one on one tutoring sessions for students who are 
having difficulty in a particular class, and numerous 
committees are in the process of studying our policies 
regarding class rank, weighted grades, National Honor 
Society regulations, etc. 

In retrospect, the 92-93 school year was 
wonderfully productive and, most importantly, the 
programs that have been created are impacting kias in a 
positive manner. I hope and expect that the future will 
hold even more and expanded opportunities for our kids to 
succeed. 



59 



from the principal of 
McCarthy middle school 



The 1993-1994 school year has seen the 
continuation of the teaming structure at the sixth and 
seventh grade levels. Our experience at these grades will 
help us in introducing the team concept to the eighth grade 
staff next year. The enrollment has Been as high as 1,039 
students this year. We add one or two students each month 
to the school. The staff has been cooperative in that there 
are very few rooms that are not utilized during the entire 
day. The teaching staff utilizes the library and small 
storages areas as staff planning rooms. Also we currently 
use the cafeteria as a large study hall area during the early 
morning and late afternoon. 

While most teaching staff are assigned solely to the 
McCarthy Middle School, we continue to share some staff 
members with the High School, the Parker, and the 
Harrington. This sharing of staff will hopefully be 
reduced or eliminated in the future as it places additional 
constraints on our ability to be flexible in our scheduling of 
students and staff. 

Several of our staff members have involved their 
classes in cooperative learning groups. The staff has seen 
these students making significant gains in their ability to 
analyze a problem, collect significant data, and make 
appropriate conclusions. 

In the 1994-1995 school year we will be housing 
nine classrooms of fifth grade students. We are looking 
forward to working with these young students and their 
teachers. While the curriculum for the students will remain 
the same, we will be working with teachers and parents to 
make a smooth transition for these children. 

With the eighth grade moving into a teaming 
structure, all rooms will be utilized and several additional 
staff members (floaters) will not have a room for a home 
base next year. 

We are about to acquire seven new Macintosh 
computers for our computer center. Three new computers 
and a CD-Rom are being placed in the library. We are also 
anticipating the purchase of additional computers from the 



60 



1994-1995 budget to complete our computer lab. 
Hopefully in preparation for the 1995-1996 school year, 
we will be able to connect some existing classrooms and the 
libraries to form a large information and technology center. 

The intramural and activity program has been made 
available to the current sixth grade students at the Parker 
School. These students are brought to the McCarthy at the 
end of the school day and join with the McCarthy students 
in activities such as band, science club etc. 

The 1992-1993 school year saw the retirement of 
several long time staff members: Mr. Ted Dulski, Social 
Studies, Mrs. Mary Jean Wilson, English. The 
administration, staff, and students of the McCarthy Middle 
School would like to thank them for their commitment to 
the education of the students of Chelmsford and wish them 
health and happiness in their retirement. 



61 



FROM THE OFFICE OF STUDENT/ 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 



During 1993 Community Education/Student 
Services continued overseeing guidance and support staff 
K- 12 as well as managing Adult Education, Summer 
School, School Aged Childcare and the ABC's enrichment 
program. 

Evening programs including our own Adult 
Education, Northeastern University and Middlesex 
Community College offer over 1,200 courses during Fall, 
Winter and. Spring semesters. 

Childcare programs for school-age children are 
offered from 7:00AM to 6:00PM for 50 weeks of the year. 
After school enrichment courses for our students in the 
ABC's program continue to be a success in all elementary 
buildings. 

Our Summer School program offered almost 500 
students both enrichment and remedial programs during 
July and August. 

All programs continue to be offered to the public on 
a self supporting basis. Please look for the Community 
Education brochure which is mailed to all residents during 
August, December and March. 

Highlights from the Guidance Report are: 

o 91 % of 1993 graduates went on to post-secondary 

education 
o Class of 1 993 drop out rate was less than 1 % 
o SAT/College Board scores continued to be 

above both the state and national averages. 

We are proud of our accomplishments and wish to 
thank the town for their continued support. 



62 



FROM THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 



Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1993, there were 367 graduates, Of those 
graduates, 334 went on to post-secondary education which 
represents 91%. 



4 year colleges 289 

2 year colleges 35 

technical schools 10 




33T 



In terms of non-educational placements, 234 
students elected employment, seven joined the military, one 
student was a foreign exchange student and one student was 
undecided. 

Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1993, 123 students took 194 Advanced 
Placement Examinations at Chelmsford High School, with 
77% of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The program 
grades on a nve-point college-level scale: 

5 - extremely well qualified 

4 - well qualified 

3 - qualified 

2 - possibly qualified 

1 - no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable to 
college grades of A, and grades 3 and 2 most comparable to 
college grades of B and C, respectively. Many colleges 
will award a third to a full year of placement and credit to 
successful AP candidates. 

Drop Out Rate 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School 
continues to be low. During the 1992-93 academic year, 
CHS had a total student enrollment of 1,463. The number 
of drop outs was 13, which represents a drop out rate of 

.y/c. 



63 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1 


With/ 
Drawal 




Employ/ 
Ment 


Leave 


Total 


Boys 2 


1 


8 


11 


Girls 





2 


2 


Total 2 


1 


10 


13 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the 
Class of 1993 continue to be higher than the average 
Massachusetts and National scores. In the verbal area, 
Chelmsford's average score was 453 which is 26 points 
higher than the State average (427) and 29 points higher 
than the National average (424). 

In the math area, Chelmsford scored 507 which is 
3 1 points higher than the State average (476) and 29 points 
higher than the National average (47 8). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Program 

In the 1992-93 academic year, 114 students enrolled 
in eight Service Study and Career Exploration programs. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective 
designed to combine practical experience with the students' 
academic studies as they use their free time to pursue an 
area similar to their chosen field. There is an opportunity 
for students to assist our athletic trainer, and there are 
several programs designed for students who are interested 
in working with special needs children. 

The Career Exploration Program gives a unique 
opportunity to all students to supplement their schedule and 
gain insight and experience as they volunteer to assist in 
our offices, library, science lab and television studio. 

Scheduling for these programs is flexible, and the 
electives may be taken for one semester or the entire year. 
All students are placed in their preferred area and credits 
are distributed according to the number of periods they 
work, their performance and attendance. 



64 



Career Center 

The Chelmsford High School Career Center is a 
facility utilized by our students and members of the 
community to research colleges, occupations, and 
vocational schools. Part of the research is accomplished 
through the use of computers which give available 
information on colleges (two year through graduate 
school), occupations, and financial aid. For students who 
do not know that line of endeavor they wish to pursue, 
there is a specific file which will give helpful suggestions. 
In addition, there is an infinite variety or books available 
for research. 

College catalogues, applications, and financial aid 
information, as well as registration information for the 
S.A.T. and Achievement tests are housed in the Career 
Center. A VCR is available with a wide assortment of 
more than 135 tapes in our library. 

During 1992-93, 123 college representatives visited 
the high school, as well as speakers from business, 
industry, colleges, and business schools. These speakers 
give informative presentations to various classes. Military 
personnel visit for recruiting purposes and scholarship in 
information. 

During the school year, our juniors as well as 
various classes are introduced to the Career Center with an 
orientation presentation. 

For students interested in immediate employment, 
positions on a part-time and permanent basis are posted and 
employment counseling is available. 



65 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 



The School Department has operated its own in- 
house computer service bureau since 1981. During this 
time all major business and student applications have been 
automated on our own computer system. The "workhorse" 
for this computerization effort has been a Digital VAX/750 
and a PDP 11/44 minicomputer. 

Many of the computer systems used are over 10 
years old. The hardware and software are approaching the 
end of its cost effective life. Older computer technologies 
are more expensive to maintain and do not take advantage 
of the ability to reduce our operating costs with newer 
electronic technology. 

The development of software and information 
systems for the town and schools must be focused on 
maximizing the value and utility of information while 
minimizing the cost and effort to the user. There are many 
applications that are shared by both town and school 
offices. A good example of this school and town 
collaboration is the Town Clerk computerization effect. 
Also the schools and town have embarked on a common 
long distance carrier venture which has saved the town up 
to 20% on our long distance calls. 

With these objectives in mind, the school and town 
offices have started to implement LAN's (Local Area 
Networks) at each specific location. The complete range of 
distributed and network computing will be utilized to 
develop an in-house electronic highway in each local town 
and school building. In the near future, these LAN's will 
be bridged to various other networks in town to share 
relevant data. This is a critical phase since our common 
financial systems are inter-relatea and require redundancy 
at both the school and the town end. 

Other future involvement will revolve around data 
communications and telecommunications. Technical 

obstacles to these formidable endeavors are being evaluated 
and have the potential to significantly decrease operating 
costs to the town. This electronic highway promises to 
bring the town and schools out of the trailing edge 
computer technology" mode into the real computer 
business world. 



66 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH 

(GRADES 6-8) 



During the last year the Language Arts Department 
at the middle school level has been working with the 
Reading Department in a curriculum review in grades K- 
12. We are examining the strengths and weaknesses of our 
curriculum as it exists in the K-12 continuum. We are 
exploring the research to ascertain possible changes we 
need to make. 

We have also been participating in the WordMaster 
vocabulary program, a national competition dealing with 
vocabulary and its use in analogies. We have done 
consistently well at all levels but nave placed first in the 
nation in two of the competitions. 



67 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The English Department and our students have 
many achievements of which to be proud in the academic 
year 1992-93. The high level or performance by our 
students in their course work and on standardized testing, 
particularly on the AP English examination, is rewarding to 
our most dedicated teachers of English. The recognition 
received by our students in the area of writing is most 
reassuring. Jeffrey Cantara, Class of 1993, received the 
Bard College Prize for Critical Writing, Victoria Groves, 
Class of 1996, placed first locally and second in the 
regional competition of the Voice of Democracy speech 
writing contest sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
Paul Butler, Louise Chen, and Adam Needles, all from the 
Class of 1994, were chosen semi-finalists as juniors in the 
National Council Teachers of English Achievements in 
Writing program. This commitment toward developing 
writing done in social studies and science courses, for our 
Writings On the Wall program. Students so recognized this 
year by the WOW program: Ainez Baez, Setn Brooks, 
Tony Brown, Jessica Dechane, Joshua Friedman, Mike 
Freitas, Nicole Gelinas, John Guarnieri, John Hiltz, Maral 
Jaknavorian, Gary Koltookian, Melissa Lemkin, Martha 
Seneta, Mai Tuyet Pho, and Melanie Weir. 

Chelmsford High School placed first in the state and 
fifth in the nation in the Language Arts Olympiad 
competition. Over 200 ninth grade students participated in 
this year's competition in May. This test, wnich measures 
skills in reading, vocabulary, and grammar, allows our top 
ten performers to be compared nationally with students in 
participating public and private schools. The top ten 
performers in order of performance are Maureen Long, 
first place, Melissa Eisenman, second place, Sarah Dubner, 
third place, Julie Waszczak, Jessica Peters, Kevin 
Papenfuss, Brian Petro-Roy, Charlton Chen, Patrick 
Harrington, and Chris Price. 



68 



The English Department continues to be successful 
due to the efforts or our teachers toward continued 
professional growth. Members of our department attended 
and presented at both national and regional conferences. 
Liz Foster, a teach of English 12 and writing courses, had a 
manuscript titled "The Power of Persona in Shakespeare," 
which she developed with Rebecca Burnett, a former 
member of our department, accepted for publication in the 
English Journal. Stephen Meidell, Department Head for 
English, was selected for inclusion in Who's Who Among 
America's Teachers for the second consecutive year. With 
a positive attitude toward continued development of 
successful strategies for developing student potential, 
representatives of teachers of Language Arts, K-12 have 
joined with administrators and parents to embark on a 
process of program evaluation. Under the guidance of Dr. 
David Troughton, Assistant Superintendent, this committee 
will review recent research on the teaching of language arts 
and conduct a needs assessment of our present curriculum. 



69 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
FINE ARTS 



This year the Chelmsford Public Schools' Fine Arts 
Department continues to do its best to educate the students 
of Chelmsford in art and music. With the support of the 
administration, the Cultural Council, and the Chelmsford 
Friends of Music, the Fine Arts Department offers a wide 
variety of experiences for students. 

The monthly art shows in the Administration 
Building's Frank Page Gallery continued in 1992-93, 
drawing rave reviews from visitors. In addition, each 
school showcased student work during "Youth Art Month" 
in March at the annual Town- Wide Art show. 
Approximately 300 works (from grades one through 
twelve) were on exhibit. The formal opening night 
included performances by music students from grades four 
through twelve, as well as delicious refreshments provided 
by the Food Service Department. The level of 
accomplishment by the student artists (both visual and 
musical) was indeed impressive. Chelmsford students also 
received awards at the Boston Globe Scholastic Art 
Competition and at Art All-State. 

In the music area of the Fine Arts Department, the 
popular Town-wide Choral Festival in March and the 
Town-Wide String Festival in May drew large audiences to 
these showcases for the vocal and string students of 
Chelmsford. Of course, schools held winter and spring 
concerts either in their own buildings or in the McCarthy 
Middle School Auditorium. The nigh school musical, 
"Fiddler on the Roof," was once again an unqualified 
success in May, selling out nearly every available seat at 
each of three performances. Instrumentally, the 

rejuvenated high school band received high praise from 
parents, faculty and students for their performances at the 
ten home and away football games. In addition, band 
members from grades five through twelve marched in the 
annual Memorial Day and Fourth of July parades. At the 
regional and state levels, Chelmsford's music students were 
well represented at the Junior and Senior Northeast District 
Music Festivals as well as at the All-State Concert. 



The successes of these secondary art and music 
students are the result of careful preparation and training 
that begins at the earliest grade levels of elementary school 
art and music classes. In these classes students learn the 
basic skills and concepts fundamental to Fine Arts success 
in the upper grades. Also students learn self-discipline 
and cooperation, skills which will assist them throughout 
their lives in whatever their chosen vocations. 

In 1993-94, the Fine Arts Department will begin a 
curriculum review process as part of the school system's 
curriculum review and evaluation sequence. Another 
undertaking will be the Chelmsford High School Band and 
Orchestra's planned ten-day concert tour of Austria, 
France, Germany and Switzerland. 



71 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(GRADES 7-12) 



Students studying foreign language at CHS and 
McCarthy participated in a variety of activities this past 
year. In March, the department observed Foreign 
Language Week. At McCarthy there was a field trip to see 
a program of French and Spanish singing and dancing, a 
poster contest, a food festival, films and games. At CHS, 
there was a poster contest, T-shirt day and a trivia contest. 
ESL students joined in the celebration by helping to 
decorate the front hall and the showcase outside their 
classroom. Second-year students saw a film promoting 
foreign language study, even the cafeteria menu for the 
week was presented in a different language each day. 

Other important events and activities throughout the 
year included the first French Achievement exam with 
listening taken in November by approximately 20 students. 
French AP and Spanish IVA students participated in the 
interactive television program broadcast through MCET 
(MA Corp. for Ed. Communications). French students 
traveled to UMASS Amherst for Foreign Language Day. 
Forty two students were inducted into the French and 
Spanish Honor Societies. 

Several members of the Foreign Language staff 
participated in a variety of workshops and conferences, in 
particular, the annual Massachusetts Foreign Language 
Conference in Sturbridge. Mrs. Flight and Mrs. Tonrey 
attended a cooperative learning workshop, and Ms. 
Pelletier participated in an AP workshop. Ms. 

Michopoulos was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study 
in Morocco next fall, and Mrs. Flight participated in a 
multi cultural program during April vacation in Puerto 
Rico sponsored by North Adams State College. 



72 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES 6-8) 



The nature of Mathematics in the Middle School is 
one of diversification in curriculum and aptitude. It is the 
mission of the McCarthy Middle School Math Department 
to assist each student in achieving his/her individual 
potential within one of the five levels offered, including 
accelerated programs in Algebra and Geometry. With the 
emphasis on problem solving, we have successfully 
introduced several math competition programs to challenge 
all students. We have incorporated the use of hands-on 
math manipulatives and alternative assessments in the 
classroom. Approximately 1,200 students continue to 
compete in the Continental Math League and New England 
Math League Contests. 

Some initiatives this year include the Math Counts 
National Competition Program, a Portfolio pilot in grade 8 
and a Pre-algebra program in grades seven and eight. Our 
teachers, in addition to teaching regular classes, are 
actively continuing their education in the area of new 
programs, mainstreaming and are updating curriculum 
through the successful In-Service Workshop programs. 
Teachers also attend various conferences including the 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional 
Conference, conferences using math manipulatives, 
cooperative learning, integration and alternative 
assessment. 

The success of our program is evident in the 
accomplishments of several students who achieved perfect 
scores and received recognition for their participation in 
Continental Math League. Our results in National testing 
reinforces our belief that our goals are achievable and our 
methods are productive. 

This year the Robert McCullough Mathematics 
Award was awarded to Vivian Hsu. 



73 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Mathematics 
Department continues to incorporate the recommendations 
contained in the Professionaf and Curriculur Standards 
published by the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics. 

Many of our teachers have attended workshops and 
seminars on a variety of topics. John Ramalho attended the 
Annual Conference of the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics held in Seattle, Washington. Richard Olson 
and Ann Swierzbin attended Inside Windows at Mastering 
Computers, Inc. Linda Geohegan and Rebecca Nordengren 
attended a Cooperative Learning Workshop at the Institute 
for Educational Development. Barry Ware and John Lang 
attended a seminar on the new P.S.A.T. and S.A.Ti 
sponsored by the New England Regional Office of the 
College Board. Ann Swierzbin and John Lang also 
attended numerous workshops and training sessions 
involving the Regular Education Initiative of Special 
Education. 

There was one major curriculur revision in our level 
three program. A new textbook, Holt Algebra and 
Trigonometry was adopted for use in both our Algebra 
Two and Algebra Three / Trigonometry courses. This 
revision should help to provide better continuity and 
diversity of topics in both classes. We are also piloting 
Mathematical Corrections and Gateways to Algebra and 
Geometry in our Pre- Algebra classes. 

I am please to report that Richard Olson was 
appointed to coach the Math League Team and we are 
anticipating continued success in their competitions. 



74 



FROM THE READING DEPARTMENT HEAD 
(GRADES K-12) 



The face of reading instruction has changed in many 
ways, yet the desired outcome remains the same - joyful 
literacy for all. The school year was a busy one for the 
Reading Department. A curriculum review was completed 
in grades 7 and 8, the culmination of which was the 
adoption of a new reading program. The McCarthy 
Reading Specialists spend the 1992-1993 year previewing 
and piloting the materials under consideration. 

This year grades kindergarten through six are 
undergoing the same process. Nationally acclaimed 
experts in reading and language arts provided workshops 
and seminars. Three groups of teachers volunteered to 
assist in the curriculum review process. First, a 
Reading/English/Language Arts Review (RELAX) 
Committee was formed to investigate current research, 
look at exemplary programs and conduct a needs 
assessment. This committee consists of approximately 
twenty-five teachers, administrators and parents and is still 
exploring the vast amount of information available. 
Another group, made up of approximately forty teachers 
and specialists, formed a Basal/ Anthology review (BAR) 
Committee to investigate the current best programs whicn 
would meet the criteria established for the reading program. 
Narrowing the choices down to three programs, another 
forty teachers volunteered to become pilot teachers for the 
remainder of the year. This is currently underway. 

As an outgrowth of the teachers' involvement in 
workshops, in-service, course offerings and program 
review we have come to realize the importance of a fully 
integrated approach to reading, rather as language arts. 
We nave examined and embraced emergent literacy and 
writing in response to reading, utilizing journals and 
portfolios. Continuous emphasis on responding to open- 
ended questions in written form is evident. Additional 
methods of assessment, including portfolio assessment, are 
being studied. Attention is given to 'test readiness' as this 
is a year when our 4th, 8th, and 10th grade students will be 
tested on the MEAP the Massachusetts Educational 
Assessment Program. Fourth grade students at two schools 
are taking part in a national sample by the Massachusetts 
Department of Education for the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress. 



75 



We are fortunate to be able to offer supportive 
reading services to our students at Chelmsford High 
School. There are a variety of classes and meeting times to 
fit the needs of the students. Again the focus is on literacy, 
but ultimately on the strengthening of the reading abilities 
of all students which will enable them to meet success in 
their classes and in future endeavors. Comprehension, rate 
and vocabulary are stressed in the context of reading good 
literature. These activities are tailored to fit the student 
who is learning English as well as the college bound 
student. 

The Reading Department is responsible for 
conducting testing and assessment in reading, either as a 
diagnostic service or informally. All Reading Specialists 
have Masters Degree and are certified as reading 
specialists. Depending on the school, grade level ana 
needs of the students, the Specialist can be involved in 'in- 
class' support, 'pull-out' programs, literacy or book 
discussion groups, tutorials, testing, special projects, 
consulting with classroom teachers and the SPED team and 
conducting in-service meetings with their schools. It is the 
policy of the reading department, at all schools, to do pre 
and post testing for all the students in its program. These 
results are sent home and decisions and recommendations 
for educational needs are made to parents. 

We have come to realize the value of continued 
instruction and emphasis in reading and that this should not 
stop at the end of the elementary grades. Children learn to 
read by reading and they improve their reading skills by 
reading more and more. 



76 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE 

(GRADES 6-8) 



Over the three years of middle school science, the 
students cover general science and the environment in the 
sixth grade; life science in the seventh grade; and the earth 
sciences in the eight grade. 

The major goal of the middle school science 
curricula is to teach the students the skills that they will 
need to think logically in order to make wise decisions to 
solve real life problems or situations. The students are 
trained in organization, listening, note taking, logical 
thinking, and concept formation skills. As the three years 
progress, students become more involved in problem 
solving situations where they must form hypotheses, 
experiment, observe, record measured and collected data, 
analyze results, form conclusions and report upon the 
findings. 

To enrich the science curriculum, the sixth grade 
Environmental Program will have the students going to a 
forest and a shore location as Great Meadows, or Blue 
Hills, and Plum Island or Seabrook. Also, Hewlett- 
Packard funding has provided additional opportunities for 
students to participate in the Science By Mail Program, the 
computer lab and in the use of the Science Screen Report 
materials. 

During the 1993-1994 academic year, the teachers 
in the science department, in addition to teaching their 
classes, have been busy taking graduate courses, revising 
curriculum guides, planning science field experiences, 
designing new lessons and Tabs, and learning to use new 
technology. Also, they have been attending inservice 
programs, conferences and workshops on such topics as 
middle school education, cooperative learning, 
heterogeneous grouping, outcome based education, 
inclusion and other current educational topics. 



77 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School science department 
continues to make progress in updating it's curriculum and 
methods of instruction. We owe a tremendous thank you to 
Hewlett-Packard for investing in the future of CHS students 
with the donation of twelve networked computers. 

The computer lab is up and operating thanks to the 
cooperation and efforts of Mr. Andy Sorenson, of our staff, 
and the support staff of Hewlett-Packard. The lab sees 
consistent use on a daily basis. Thanks to the support of 
the Town of Chelmsford we have been able to purchase, 
over the past three years, state of the art IBM interfacing 
devices or which we have made constant use at all grade 
and educational levels. Thanks to these cooperative 
efforts, the students get a true feel for what it means to be 
a scientist or technician in today's laboratory. 

While we are on the subject of modern technology 
in the classroom, it's important to point out that the 
chemistry teachers are still active with two-way television. 
They have just finished the synthesis and half-life 
determination of aluminium. It is always a pleasure to 
work with the staff at UMASS Lowell. By the time you 
read this, the AP chemistry class will have completed the 
caffeine analysis of several brands of sodas utilizing high 
performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) over the two 
way television network. 

We continue to search for ways to utilize the 
resources beyond the walls of our school. We try to do 
this with minimum disruption to the school day of the 
students. The school is a member of (REMS)2, a regional 
electronic magnet school for students interested in science 
and math. This program is a result of a grant received by 
the Merrimack Education Center. Presently we have four 
sophomores in the program and will induct four more this 
year. Science teachers and the students from the 13 area 
schools involved in the project spent two weeks at UMASS 
Lowell this past summer preparing for the project work 
involved. 



78 



Students from the honors biology classes have gone 
to Boston University to participate in the CITY LAB 
program. The students get hands on experience in areas of 
bio-technology. Some of the same students get a chance to 
work with an electron microscope at the Museum of 
Science. These students are transported by parents. Mr. 
Bernard Queenan coordinates both programs. 

Thanks to DUPONT for sending Mr. Michael Tate 
to Anaheim for the 1994 National Science Teachers 
Association National Convention. We hope it is still then 
when he arrives. 



79 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(GRADES 6-8) 



The Social Studies Department has had a productive 
year thus far. The transition of some 6th grade teachers to 
the Parker School has gone well as all books and materials 
were in place. The geography bee was again a success and 
our winner was chosen to participate in the state finals. 
The teachers are reviewing materials, such as maps, 
videos, that need to be updated as the world has changed so 
dramatically in the past five years. The 6th grade teachers 
will be looking at new texts for the future. Teachers in 
grade 6 and /will assess the value of the newly written 
curriculum guides. Social Studies teachers have attended 
more conferences and workshops this year in order to 
ascertain new and varied ways to teach the subject. All in 
all, it has been a very active year. . 



80 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Social Studies 
Department offers a challenging and diverse program 
designed to meet the challenges of citizenship in an 
increasingly interconnected global community. The 
department teaches social studies to encourage the 
development of analytical reasoning, to develop essential 
academic skills, and to engender an appreciation of the 
rights and responsibilities of an informed politically active 
citizenry. 

Students take required courses in Political Science 
and United States History. They can fill out their academic 
programs with a myriad of offerings such as: World 
History, Economics, Psychology, Modern Problems, The 
Holocaust, Asian History and others. Course offerings are 
supplemented with field trips, the News Quiz competition, 
Model United Nations, the mock trial competition, History 
Day programs, Student Government Day, and guest 
speakers. 

The social studies faculty has kept stride with 
changes in course content, teaching techniques, and 
academic technology. Attendance at conferences and 
workshops is but one of the many ways the department 
discharges its obligation to continue professional 
development. The faculty is also actively involved in 
evaluating and selecting new United States History texts for 
fall 1994 as part of the department's five-year textbook 
rotation. 

Finally, the Social Studies Department is grateful to 
W. Allen Thomas for his nine years of dedicated leadership 
as department head. Robert C. Lemire, Jr., because 
department head in September 1993. 



81 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(GRADES K-12) 



A variety of initiatives were accomplished over the 
past year. The "Growing Healthy" R-5 curriculum 
workshops, phase in, and coring were completed. A new 
health curriculum called "Into Adolescence" was adopted 
for grade six. A sixth grade parent HIV/AIDS/Maturation 
program was held which included a guest speaker, a 
curriculum review, and the loan of TLC "Talk, Listen, 
Care" Kits to parents. The middle school CPR staff 
continued to certify 8th grade students and began annual 
recertification of all physical educators and nurses. 
Various AIDS Task Force recommendations were acted on 
including the yearly update of the entire health education 
staff on HIV/AIDS. High school seniors were presented 
the "Chaulk Shock" program which depicted a drunk 
driving accident in order to discourage drinking and 
driving. Through the Drug Free Schools and Communities 
and the Comprehensive Health and Human Services Grants 
programs were provided for students, parents, teachers, 
and staff. Membership in Project Alliance provided 
additional programs for staff on sexual harassment and 
violence prevention. Peer mediation/conflict resolution 
programs are currently being explored for the high school 
and middle schools. Working in cooperation with the 
Chelmsford Community AIDS Task Force, an HIV/AIDS 
program was planned for high school students which 
centered around the display of the NAMES Project AIDS 
Memorial Quilt. The display was alos scheduled for public 
viewing. 



82 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
FOR ATHLETICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department 
during the 1992-193 school year fielded 29 Varsity 
Programs, 22 Sub- Varsity Programs, and 3 Seasonal 
Trainer Programs. An overall record from 350 Varsity 
Contests was 215-120-18 with 1,067 Athletes, 24 Team 
Managers and 7 Student Trainers involved in the program. 
The Varsity Football, Golf, Girls Volleyball, Boys 
Swimming, Girls Track and Wrestling Teams were 
Conference Champions, with the Boys Cross Country and 
Golf Teams Northern Area Champions, and the Wrestling 
Team Dual Meet State Champions. 



83 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal 
Government's Public Law 94-142, the Education of 
Handicapped Children Action, were enacted to assure that 
all handicapped children have a free and appropriate 
education to be provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is 
responsible for providing effective programs and services 
for children, ages three through twenty-two, who are found 
to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each 
handicapped student receives an education designed to 
meet his or her unique learning needs and to receive the 
services in the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1993, the Special Education 
Department had 858 students registered to receive special 
education services, which represents 16 percent of 
Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-three special education personnel 
develop and implement the individual educational plans for 
these students. For those students with severe learning 
and/or emotional needs. Chelmsford provides for 
placement in private day or residential schools as approved 
by the State Department of Education. 

Chelmsford High School, in partnership with The 
Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, developed a 
Student Assistance Program for those students returning 
from private special education schools, hospital 
placements, or currently attending the high school who 
require intensive social, emotional, and/or academic 
intervention in order to maximize their educational 
experience. 

For the 199-31994 school year, Teacher Assistant 
Teams (TATs) have been implemented for the purpose of 
providing intervention strategies for students experiencing 
any difficulties before a referral is initiated for a Special 
Education Team Evaluation. 



84 



The Chelmsford Special Education Department has 
a budget of $4,429,728 of which $329,965 is provided 
through grants by the federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue its 
quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs and 
services for the children we serve. 



85 



NASHOBA VALLEY 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The NVTHS District serves the towns of 
Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, Pepperell, Shirley, 
Townsend, and Westford. 

District School Committee 



Stratos Dukakis, 


CHMN 


Chelmsford 


Charla Boles, VCHMN 


Groton 


Irene Machemer, 


SEC 


Townsend 


Charlotte Scott 




Westford 


Samual Poulten 




Chelmsford 


Susan Carr 




Chelmsford 


Robert Union 




Westford 


Augustine Kish 




Littleton 


Karen Johnson 




Shirley 


Joan O'Brien 




Westford 


Jerrilyn Bozicas 




Pepperell 


Howard Burns 


Alternates 


Pepperell 


Al Buckley 
Thomas Carey 




Pepperell 
Chelmsford 


Robert Carlo 




Westford 


Harvey Atkins, Jr. 


Littleton 


Stephen Dunbar 




Townsend 


Jordan Waugh 




Groton 


L. Peter Noddin 


Administration 


Shirley 



Fred H. Green 
David McLaughlin 
Victor Kiloski 
Paula Page 
Ralph Dumas 



Super-Director 
Assistant Dir/Princ. 
Academic Curr. Coord. 
Special Needs Coord. 
Business Manager 



86 



The Nashoba Valley Technical High 
enrollment, as of October 1, 1993, is as follows: 



School 



Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Tuitioned 

TOTAL 



96 
36 
18 
76 
69 
51 
42 
50 

438 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited 
by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 
Inc. and provides it students with on-the-job training, 
saleable skills, a co-op program, a high school diploma, a 
trade certificate, an opportunity for further education, and 
job placement. 

Each year, Qualified seniors may elect to take 
advantage of our Cooperative Training Program which 
allows senior students to work in industry or business and 
receive valuable training in their chosen fields as well as 
wages. 



The following 
Valley Technical High 



>rograms 
>chool. 



are offered at Nashoba 



Technical Programs 



Auto Body Repair 
Automotive Technology 
Carpentry 

Culinary Arts & Baking 
Data Processing 
Drafting Technology 
Electrical Technology 
Electronics 



Graphic Arts 
Horticulture/Landscaping 
Machine Tool Technology 
Medical Occupations 
Metal Fabrications & Wei 
Painting & Decorating 
Plumbing & Heating 
Building & Grounds 
(Special Needs) 



87 



MATHEMATICS 

Algebra I, II 
Computation I, II 
Plane Geometry 
Applied Math I, II 
Business Math 
Trigonometry 
Consumer Math 
Special Education 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health Education 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Civics 

Geography 

U.S. History I II 

How to Start Your Own 

Business 
Special Education 



Academic Programs 
ENGLISH 



Composition I, II III, IV 
Literature I, II, III, IV 
Tech Prep 

Applied Communications 
Special Education 

COMPUTERS 

Keyboard Skills 
Computer Basics 
Computer Apps I, II, III 



SCIENCE 

Applied Biology 
Princ. of Techn. I, II 
Applied Chemistry 
Environmental Science 
Special Education 



In addition to the technical and academic programs 
a full Inter Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to all 
students. 

Adult and Community Education 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult and 
Community Education Program is open to anyone of high 
school age or over. Resiaents from all courses which are 
offered during both the fall and spring semesters. This 
year 531 stuaents enrolled in our Adult Education Program 
during the fall semester. 

Adult Day Classes 

This year, to accommodate District citizens who are 
unemployed or under employed. Nashoba Tech is 
accepting adults into some of the technical programs where 
space is available. This program helps adults position or 
become better qualified in their present positions, thereby 
offering the under employee a better change at promotions. 



88 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Members: 

Eileen M. Duffy - Chairperson 
Harold Organ, Jr. 
Gustave HT Fallgren 
Robert Kydd 
Ronald Pare 

Leonard Richards, Alternate 
Karen Wharton, Alternate 
Karen Karpawich, Alternate 

The Board of Appeals conducts public hearings for 
those applicants requesting a variance or special permit 
from the zoning bylaws of the Town of Chelmsford. 
Forty-one public hearings were held in 1993, with the 
following statistics. 





V 


SP 


CP 


TOTAL 


Total 


30 


15 





45 


Granted 


25 


13 





38 


Denied 


5 


2 





7 


Withdrawn 


2 


1 





3 



Where: V= Variances; SP= Special Permits; and 
CP= Comprehensive Permits 



We would like to thank Karen Karpawich, who was 
appointed this year, for her interest in serving as an 
alternate for the Board. The assistance and cooperation 
from the Board of Health, Sign Advisory Committee, 
Conservation Commission, Planning Board and Board of 
Selectmen is also greatly appreciated. 



89 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
Steve Chinetti 
James K. G if ford 
Charles Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 



The Celebrations Committee has been most active 
this past year planning, preparing and coordinating the 
1993 Annual Fourth of July Celebration. Many thanks to 
the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, No. 2310, for their funding 
and organizing. Also thanks to the Lions Club for their 
funding and organizing of the Annual Country Fair. The 
Chelmsford Art Society for the Arts Festival Fair, 
Chelmsford Community Bank, Alpine Square Dancing 
Club and all the volunteers from the various Chelmsford 
organizations who assisted and participated to make the 
26th Annual Celebration a huge success. A great thanks to 
all. Special thanks to the many volunteer hours provided 
by members of the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police and their 
Explorers Troop. 

We thank the efforts and assistance received from 
the department heads and personnel of the Police, Fire, 
Highway Parks and Public works Departments, during the 
long weekend days of the Celebration. 

The Towns Celebration Committee, is now in the 
process of planning for the 1994 Annual Fourth of July 
Celebration. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Walter Hedlund 
Chairman 



90 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 



The Chelmsford Commission on Disabilities is a 
nine member board. In 1993 those members were 
Chairman Ralph Hickey, Treasurer Paul Logan, and 
Secretary Catherine Favreau. Other members were Sue 
Brooks, Anne Donahue, Carol Miller, and Mary 
St.Hilaire. The Commission will greatly miss the work of 
former Vice Chairman Bruce Knowles. Bruce died in July. 

In 1993 the Commission continued to educate and 
enforce the laws of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In 
addition, the Commission: 



1. Raised the handicapped parking fines to $100 with 
the process being used to fund various projects for 
the disabled. 

2. Formed a social group that meets monthly. 

3. Expanded membership and added associative 
members. 



In addition, in 1993, the Commission continued to 
be very active in accessibilities issues. The Commission 
began 1993 with 13 ongoing access projects in 
Chelmsford, In addition, 2/ new access projects were 
begun in 1993. Out of the 40 access projects worked on 
during 1993, 10 were closed. The necessary access 
modifications were made. 23 were progressing. Steps 
have been taken towards improving access. More work, 
however, needs to be done. 3 were closed without access 
modifications. The Commission does not have the power 
to enforce such changes. Finally, 4 remain on hold, 
Access modifications are required, however no progress has 
been made. 

The Commission meets on the first Tuesday of the 
month and welcomes any and all public input. 



91 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Members: 

Christopher Garrahan, Chairperson 

Lynn LeMaire, Clerk 

W. Robert Greenwood 

David J. McLachlan 

Susan Carter 

Cheryl Deshaies 

The Conservation Commission's primary purpose is 
to administer the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the General Wetlands bylaw of the town. Wetlands 
are important to public, private and ground water supply; 
flood control, prevention of storm damage and pollution, 
land containing shellfish, fisheries ana protection of 
wildlife habitat and these bylaws control the activities 
which may pose a threat to these ecosystems. 

The Commission meets regularly every first and 
third Tuesday of the month with site walks on the Saturday 
before or after the meetings. In 1993 54 public hearings 
were held within 100 feet of wetlands, must be conducted 
in order to minimize possible negative effects to the 
wetlands. Another wetlands bylaws were held. Twenty- 
one determinations were on the wetlands and 8 positive 
determinations indicated that the wetlands bylaws were 
applicable. Additionally, 6 cease and desist orders were 
issued to stop all work which was adversely effecting the 
wetlands ana in violation of the state and town regulations. 

The 6 reservations in town are another focus of 
attention for the Conservation Commission, recognizing 
the need to maintain these valuable parcels of land. The 
Conservation Volunteers are to be thanked for their 
outstanding efforts and hard work at the Crooked Springs 
Reservation in North Chelmsford. This volunteer group 
has to re-establish a great deal of time to clean the 
reservation and to re-establish and map the trail system. 
We look forward to working with them in the future. 

A long standing and dedicated number of the 
Conservation Commission resigned this year. We thank 
Dr. John Droescher for his 13 years of public service. A 
vacant seat is now open to any interested applicants. 



92 



Environmental issues have a direct impact on our 
quality of life, with wetlands playing a more noticeable 
role. Citizen involvement to advise the Commission when 
damage to the wetlands is occurring is key to protecting 
these valuable assets. We would also like to thank those 
individuals who have worked with the Commission early in 
their development plans so that proper execution of 
construction can occur. 



93 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Director of Elder Affairs, Martin J.Walsh 
Chairman, William MacDonald 
Vice Chairman, Charles Pechulis 
Clerk, Maureen Evans 

Rose Arakelian Howard Mooney 

Lilla Eaton Gene Raby 

Robert Monaco Eleanor Woodward 



GOAL: 

The primary goal of the Chelmsford Council on 
Aging is to provide numerous quality programs and 
services so that the daily lives of our older citizens may be 
positively affected throughout the year. Additional 
emphasis is given to reaching the frail and homebound 
elders so that they may continue to live with independence 
and integrity. 

PROGRAMS: 

Congregate Lunch — Serve approximately 200 a day. 

Meals on Wheels — Deliver 90+ meals to shut-ins 5 days a 
week. 

Respite Care — Serve over 22 families each month. 

Friendly Visitor Program — Provides volunteer visitors for 
21 elderly residents each week . 

Fuel & Tax Assistance — Assist over 150 seniors with tax 
& fuel applications. 

Adult Day Program — Presently have 24 people enrolled, 
and we provide service for an average of 12, 4 days a week 
from 9 to 3. 

Transportation — Provide bus service for 700 trips each 
month. Priority is in meeting medical and social day care 
needs with shopping, recreation and lunches following. 

Outreach — Visit approximately 30 seniors each week to 
coordinate services with needs. 



94 



Medical — Blood pressure & sugar testing at the Senior 
Center twice a month. Hearing tests, foot care, with flu 
clinics, cholesterol and mammogram screening schedule 
periodically. 

Elderly Home Repair Service — Provide free minor home 
repair "service for two elders each week. 

Exercise Classes - 3 different exercise classes are held at 
the Senior Center each week and one aquacise class is held 
at the Radisson. 

Information & Referral — Provide information and related 
assistance for 50 seniors and their families each week, i.e., 
housing, legal assistance, homemaking, health care, etc. 

Recreational Activities & Educational Seminars — are 
always well attended and probably brings almost 800- 1 ,000 
people into the Senior Center each week. 

Senior Tax Rebate Program — is going along very well and 
I hope to place 30 seniors to wisely expend the amount that 
was approved for this program. 

GOALS FOR 94: 

1) Take over administrative responsibility for the 
nutrition program and continue with the same high 
quality food and service. 

2) Develop more intergenerational programming 
between the Chelmsford School System and our 
Senior Center. 

3) Expand the Elderly Home Repair Service so that 
even more minor repairs may be accomplished. 

4) Increase the Senior Tax Rebate Program to $15,000 
based on the progress made in FY '94. 

5) Improve the level of human services through 
interdepartmental coordination and cooperation. 

6) Continue to develop programming in response to the 
growing and changing needs of our senior 
community, i.e., caregiver support groups, 
investment club and Elder Hostel Education trips. 



95 



COMMENTARY: 

The Chelmsford Senior Center is certainly one of 
the best, and it is directly attributable to the excellent staff, 
the generous support and assistance from our "Friends" and 
the dedication and commitment of over 200 volunteers who 
contribute countless hours throughout the year. Chelmsford 
residents can indeed take pride in having such a fine Senior 
Center, and we are most thankful for your continuing 
support. 



96 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members: 

Susan Carmeris Kit Harbison 

Eliane Consalvo Karen Leonard 

Edie Copenhaver Jean McCaffery 

Judy Fichtenbaum Joyce McKenzie 
Pat Fitzpatrick 

Meetings: 1st Monday of the month 
Twice a month during Arts 
Lottery reviews 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is comprised of 
interested residents, appointed to inform the public, qualify 
applicants and dispense funds allocated by the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC), a state agency. 
The budget of the MCC is determined by the state 
legislature and the MCC's source of funds is the 
Megabucks lottery game. The Council's purpose is to 
regrant state funds for community-based arts, numanities 
and interpretive sciences projects and activities to benefit 
the residents of Chelmsford. Grant decisions are subject to 
final approval by the MCC. 

In 1993, 16 grant proposals were either partially or 
fully funded, totaling $7,358. The Chelmsford school 
system directly benefited from 7 of these proposals. 

Accomplishments this year - Plans formulated for a 
Performing Arts Series and Open Competition. Attended 
first meeting of the Community Services Board. 
Formulated 1-3-5 year plan. Distributed Community Input 
Questionnaire and held Community Input Meeting. 
Established a database for a cultural mailing list. 

New Members Charlene Creegan, Susan Carmeris 
and Judy Fictenbaum were welcomed. The resignation of 
Jeff Brem and Charlene Creegan were regretfully accepted. 
Appreciation was expressed to Margrit Mason who left the 
Council after serving a 3 -year term. 

Future projects include - Community Input Meeting, March 
7, 1994. Continuation of Performing Arts Series. Member 
of Community Service Board. Funaraising opportunities to 
benefit cultural programs. 



97 



OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



Walter R. Hedlund, Emergency Coordinator 
John Abbott 
J. Bradford Cole 
George R. Dixon 

The Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency 
(CEMA) has been very active during the year of 1993, with 
a State of Emergency being declared by the Town, State 
and Federal Governments due to the March 13, 1993 
blizzard. Many volunteer hours were spent by CEMA 
personnel and other volunteer residents of the Town at the 
Emergency Operating Center at the Town Offices. Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Mass. 
Emergency Agency (MEMA) conducted surveys of various 
damage and overtime costs, and the Town became eligible 
for Federal and State funding of which some funds nave 
been received and other funding pending. 

The CEMA volunteers meet once a month, 
preparing various reports for Federal and State Emergency 
Agencies, this office responded on March 30, 1993, to 
various sections of Town due to heavy rains with many 
small streams overflowing their banks due to the 
Merrimack River flooding. We also responded to the 
earthquake tremor of July 27 1993 in the West Chelmsford 
Area of 2.3 on the Richter Scale according to the Weston 
Observatory. The Emergency Coordinator and members 
have spent many volunteer hours at FEMA & MEMA 
Agencies Seminars on Hazardous Materials and Natural 
Disasters. The CEMA personnel wish to thank the Town 
Manager, Board of Selectmen, all department heads and 
their personnel for the outstanding cooperation received by 
them during a most trying year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



98 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Members: 

D wight Hayward, Chairman 

Hal Matzkin, Vice Chairman 

Bev Koltookian 

Mike McCall 

John Morrison 

Chuck Piper 

Barbara Skaar 

Susan Olsen, Committee Clerk 

The Finance Committee is composed of seven 
members who are appointed by the Town Moderator, 
Dennis McHugh, to terms of three years each. The 
Committee is the arm of the Town Meeting. As such it's 
primary mission is to study and make recommendations on 
articles that are considered at town meetings. The 
Committee meets every Tuesday and Thursday from 
January through March to hear, analyze, and discuss 
departmental budgets presented by independent boards and 
various department heads. These budgets form the basis of 
the Town Manager's budget which is considered at the 
April Town Meeting. Based on it's deliberations, the 
committee makes a recommendation to the Town Meeting 
Representatives on each budget line item. Throughout the 
remainder of the year, the Committee meets about twice 
monthly. 

The Committee also meets with petitioners, 
proponents and other interested parties with respect to 
warrant articles that are to be considered at April and 
October Town Meetings. After due deliberation, the 
Committee makes recommendations to the Town Meeting 
Representatives on these articles. 

The Committee communicates with the Town 
Meeting Representatives and other citizens throughout its 
warrant books which are published for the spring and fall 
Town Meetings. In addition to it's recommendations, the 
Committee includes financial data and other useful 
information in it's report. Susan Olsen, Committee Clerk, 
is responsible for the majority of the work in preparing this 
report. 



99 



Each of the members is a liaison to \arious town 
departments, committees, and boards on all of their budget 
matters. There is also a FinCom member (John Morrison) 
who is represented on the Capital Planning Committee. 

There are periodic joint quarterly meetings with the 
Selectmen, School Committee, Town Manager and 
Superintendent of Schools to discuss financial matters of 
the Town and specific subjects which are of mutual concern 
to all three committees. 

In October, the Committee attended the Annual 
Meeting of the Association of Town Finance Committees 
which is held in Framingham and consists of a range of 
seminars which vary from "Reorganization" to "Education 
Reform" to "Revenue Sources". The 1992 Chelmsford 
Warrant Book was awarded the Best report of medium size 
Towns at this Annual Meeting. 



100 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members: 

Harold J. Linnerud, Chairman 
Stephen Stowell, Vice Chairman 
Margaret Dunn 
Susan Gates 
Robert LaPorte 

Bruce Foucar, Alternate 
Brenda Lovering, Alternate 

Mary Caffelle, Clerk 

The H.D.C. functions as a regulatory commission 
for the benefit of the town. A small area of the town's 
center section is under the H.D.C.'s authority. The 
objective of the H.D.C. is to provide an expeditious 
application and review process relative to physical 
modification to the residences and businesses within the 
district. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of 
each month at the 1802 Schoolhouse. 

During the past year, the H.D.C. has accepted 22 
applications for review. The H.D.C. felt it necessary to 
conduct public hearings on 7 of these applications, with the 
remaining 15 being acted upon after waiving the use of 
public hearings. For these 22 applications, 1 8 Certificates 
of Applicability were issued, with the reaming 4 
applications being granted Certificates of Non- 
Applicability. No applications were denied. 

Major accomplishments during the past year include 
continuing progress on the completion of the Sargent and 
Krasnecki properties, the issue of the first edition of a 
Newsletter distributed to H.D.C. residents and others, and 
the initiation of a photo documentation project to record the 
physical appearance of all major properties within the 

The members of the commission wish to thank 
Harold Davis and Paul Canniff for their dedication as long 
term members of this commission. Both men contributed a 
great deal of time and energy during their many years of 
service on this board to help make the Historic District area 
of Chelmsford what it is today. They will be missed. 



101 



HOLIDAY DECORATING 
COMMITTEE 



Committee Members: 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman 

Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 

Linda Emerson 

Jean Kydd 

Dawn Siphol 

Patricia Saber 

Carolee Hill 

Jacqueline Wenschel 

Carrie Bacon 

Marie Massota 

Dennis Ready /Karen Ready 



Departmental Mission Statement: 



The Holiday Decorating Committee is a group of 
volunteers who meet when requested by its chairman to 
discuss, arrange and implement the Holiday Lighting 
Ceremony on Chelmsford Common the first weekend in 
December. The Committee, with the help of several 
interested individuals and groups, physically put up and 
take down all the tree lights. In addition the Committee 
organizes "Santa's" visit and the hayride which are 
available for all who attend the ceremony. The Committee 
also co-ordinates the business community in the Center to 
sponsor the Holiday Prelude which is free to the public. 

Budget: 

The Holiday Decorating Committee is funded by 
voluntary donations from individuals and groups in 
Chelmsford. The Town has no money, at this point, to 
fund the event and the Committee has been most thankful 
to those who have given funds to continue to make this 
event a success. We have funds in an account at the 
Enterprise Bank in Chelmsford. 



102 



Goals and Objectives: 

Our goal for 1993 was to have the Holiday Prelude 
and Lighting Ceremony on Sunday, December 5, from 4 to 
6 p.m. We had arranged for musicians, vocal groups, 
"Santa", the hayride, a "talking" tree, as well as the 
Prelude. We had also been fortunate to have one of our 
town local businessman agree to have his staff take pictures 
of all the children with Santa at no cost to our committee or 
the recipient. Unfortunately, due to the terrible weather we 
were forced to cancel the entire program. Our goal for 
1994 will be to arrange the same program and hope we will 
have good weather. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Donna A. Johnson 
Chairman 



103 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners worked diligently over the past year to 
complete the new mentally retarded respite car home to be 
located on Groton Road in North Chelmsford. The 
authority received approval in 1987 to do this development 
along with Delaney Terrace and its scattered family 
developments. MGIA Architects, Inc., from Boston was 
selected to design the one story, 8 bedroom duplex. 
Construction is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 
1993. 

The Authority completed a modernization project at 
Chelmsford Arms in May 1993. The Authority has 
upgraded the fire alarm system with the assistance of the 
Fire Department. The Architect was ASI Engineers of 
Burlington, MA, and the Contractor was Crowe Electric 
and Sons, Inc. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as of 
June 30, 1993 provide a total of 353 units of low income 
housing, 198 elderly, 14 handicapped and 141 family. 
Four of these programs are funded by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development under Chapter 667, 
Chapter 705, Chapter 689 and the new MRVP. 
Chelmsford Arms, completed in 1974, has 56 regular units 
and 8 handicapped units. The Community Residence for 
the mildly to moderately retarded was purchased in 1974 
and has 6 units. Six, 2 bedroom condominiums in 
Pickwick estates were purchased in 1981. McFarlin 
Manor, completed in 1981, has 43 regular units, 3 
handicapped units and one, 4 bedroom congregate unit 
which serves the semi-independent elderly. Delaney 
Terrace, finished in 1990, has 48 units, 3 of which are 
handicapped and a one, 4 bedroom congregate unit for the 
frail elderly. These developments are funded under the 
Chapter 667. The State eliminated the Chapter 707 
Program and replaced it with the Massachusetts Rental 
Voucher Program. Regulations on eligibility changed and 
applicants were allowed to go mobile to other communities 
on the program. The Authority, due to these program 
changes, went from 33 units down to 12. Under the 705 
Family Program, 1 1 units are scattered around Chelmsford. 
The Chapter 689 development is currently under 
construction. 



104 



The Section 8 Programs are funded by the Federal 
Government through the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. The Section 8 Existing Housing Program 
presently has 58 certificates under lease in the private 
market throughout Chelmsford and other communities and 
84 vouchers under the Section 8 Voucher Program. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority fiscal year 
ending of June 30, 1993 lists assets at $4,599,857, 
liabilities at $4,599,857, for all programs. All 

developments are inspected annually by maintenance and 
administrative staff. The Authority is especially grateful to 
those organizations which express special concern for the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority residents and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Club for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include Lisa Royce, Executive 
Director, Linda Dalton, Administrative Assistant, Nancy 
Harvey, Leased Housing Coordinator, Richard O'Neil, 
Part-Time Maintenance Laborer, Michael Harrington, 
Full-Time Grounds Keeper and Manuel Mendonca, hull- 
Time Grounds Keeper. 

Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday each 
month. The Annual Meeting is first Tuesday in May. All 
meetings are open to the public. The Chelmsford Housing 
Authority Board of Commissioners would like to thank the 
residents of Chelmsford and Town Officials for their 
continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 
Robert L. Hughes, Vice-Chairman 
William P. Keohane, Treasurer 
Lynn M. Marcella, Asst. Treasurer 
Pamela A. Turnbull, State Appointee 



105 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Members: 

Will Perry, Chairman 
Angela Cosgrove 
Joe Dyer 
Peg Fudge 
James Sousa 

Mary Casali, Personnel Coordinator 

The Personnel Board meets on the second 
Wednesday of each month at the Town Offices. Special 
work sessions are scheduled when necessary. The Board 
consists of five members (four are appointed by the Town 
Manager and one is elected by non-union employees). 

In the past year the Personnel Board concurrently 
conducted a job classification and compensation survey 
among 12 participating communities. It is anticipated that 
the Job Evaluation system will be completed in the near 
future as well as an Employee Performance Appraisal 
system. 

In its role the Personnel Board supports fair and 
equitable personnel practices affecting current town 
employees and it perpetuates Chelmsford's reputation for 
attracting and retaining highly skilled and motivated 
employees. 



106 



PLANNING BOARD 




(Front row 1-r) Thomas Firth, Jr.; Kim MacKenzie-Vice- 
Chairman; Christine Gleason-Chairman 
(Back row 1-r) Eugene Gilet-Clerk; James Creegan; James 
Good; John McCarthy 



107 



PLANNING BOARD 

Committee Members: 

Christine A. Gleason, Chairman 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice-Chairman 

Eugene E. Gilet, Clerk 

James M. Creegan 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

James P. Good 

John F. McCarthy 

Rayann E. Miethe, Principal Clerk 

The Planning Board was fortunate to have two of 
their members, with the longest longevity, be re-elected. 
Mr. Gilet 's and Mr. Firth's experience and wisdom has 
been a valued asset to this Board. At the reorganization 
meeting of 1993, the Chelmsford Planning Board elected 
the above-named officers. Mr. Eugene Gilet was chosen 
to continue to represent the Board at the Northern 
Middlesex Council of Government. Mr. Kim MacKenzie 
continues to represent the Board on the Affordable Housing 
Committee. Mr. James Good represents the Board on the 
Traffic and Safety Committee. 

the Planning Board office is open to the public on a 
part-time basis with office hours 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
daily. 

When the Planning Board function was created by 
the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 70, 
its' function was to oversee the development of the Town. 
They are also responsible for a careful study of the Town 
resources, keeping in mind the needs and conditions 
required to maintain the health and welfare of the 
citizenship. The Board's primary function is the approval 
of any construction plans for the development of the Town, 
both residential and commercial. The Board must strictly 
comply with all Zoning Regulations, Town By-Laws, Town 
Rules and Regulations and any State Laws and Mandates. 
Additional functions include, but are not limited to, the 
subdividing of property, reviewing any proposed changes 
to the Town's regulations and by-laws through a public 
hearing process. The Board is responsible for 

recommendations and reports to Town Meeting and 
producing an official town map. 



108 



In the year 1993, the Board has experienced an 
increase in construction and development plans. The 
Board has been involved in some controversial and 
complex issues. Working closely with the Town Engineer 
and the various other Town Boards and Commissions, the 
Planning Board has carefully considered all factors to reach 
the best decision for the Town and it's residents. While 
this may not always be the most popular decision, it is 
based upon cautious study and much deliberation. On last 
year's objective, the Board has had success. The Board has 
been able to have many unapproved streets brought up to 
conditions acceptable by the Town or at least get the work 
back in progress. Also, the Board is continuing to review 
the Aquifer Protection District, with the hopes of 
strengthening the regulations to bring them into 
compliance with the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection. A total of twenty-four (24) 
meetings were held. 

At these meetings, the Board held twenty-two (22) 
public hearings. Two of these were rezoning of land 
issues. The remaining twenty (20) hearings resulted in 
eight (8) subdivisions approved, seven (/) preliminary 
subdivisions processed, three (3) site plans revised, and 
two (2) sites plans approved. In addition the Board 
approved eighteen (18) Porm A Subdivision Control Law 
Not Required Plans. 



109 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Members: 

Michael Ablove, Chairman 

Robert Hayes, Vice Chairman 

Robert Charpentier 

Paul Murphy 

Evelyn Newman 

Jeff Stallard 

Ron Zylich 

Holly Rice, Recreation Coordinator 

Like all Town Departments, Recreation again was 
challenged by the budget crunch. Our goal to maintain our 
summer programs on a self-supporting basis in 1993 was 
realized. 

The Commission hired a very competent staff, with 
Steven Kelts and Dan Johnson as the summer directors. 
Steven and Dan supervised an excellent program and 
included a new project: a trip to a Boston Red Sox 
baseball game. 

Program fees remained the same in 1993, as they 
have in 1992 and 1991. As a result, registration for our 
summer programs were slightly higher than 1992, and 
enabled the summer program to remain self-supporting. 
The only area that is not self-supporting is the free swim at 
Freeman Lake. It is necessary to have two guards present 
seven days a week throughout the summer. 

Our summer program included swimming lessons, a 
water adjustment program for three and four year olds, 
tennis lessons, track and field, juggling camp, basketball, 
baseball and volleyball camps, and a very successful day 
camp program at Varney playground. An advanced tennis 
program for teenagers depends on the number of 
registrations. Recreation again sponsored many other not- 
for-profit sports camps, including field hockey, wrestling, 
football, girls basketball, youth and high school age soccer. 

Other summer activities included a summer 
basketball tournament, a trip to water country, as well as 
the previously mentioned trip to the Boston Red Sox 
baseball game. In 1994 we hope to introduce several new 
programs to be offered throughout the entire year. 



110 



Some of these programs may include Junior Ballroom 
Dancing, Gymnastics, trips to the North Shore Music 
Theater, Yoga, CPR, Mountain Climbing, Boston Bruins, 
and much more. Look for these trips and programs on 
channel 43 and in the Chelmsford Independent. 

Registration for all of our summer programs can be 
done at our Annual Activities Fair, held in June. The cost 
of the Activities Fair is absorbed by a grant from CAD AC 
(Community Alcohol and Drug Awareness Committee). 

The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another 
successful project for 1993. Thanks to continued financial 
support from Sully's Ice Cream, personnel supplied by The 
Courthouse, and help from a few local runners we were 
able to preserve a long standing Chelmsford tradition. 

Our workreation volunteer program was again 
implemented in 1993 and was very helpful. These young 
volunteers helped in beach maintenance, and also helped 
with children in the day camp and many of the other 
camps. They did a great job and should be commended for 
their dedication. 

Early this winter, the Recreation Commission began 
its initial winter program with a trip to the Nutcracker and 
the New England Patriots football game. The six week ski 
school program at Nashoba Valley celebrated its second 
season. Over one hundred Chelmsford youngsters in 
grades three through eight participated in this very 
successful after-school activity. Bob Hayes developed the 
program and Holly Rice was responsible for the 
organization and implementation of this years ski activity. 

Ms. Lorraine Murphy, our former clerk, passed 
away this year. Her efforts and dedication to the 
Recreation Department are surely missed. However, the 
combined devotion, effort, and time demonstrated by our 
Summer Directors, Recreation Coordinator, and the entire 
summer staff enabled us to run successful programs. The 
Recreation Commission would like to thank all who helped 
to make 1993 a true success. 



Ill 



SEWER COMMISSION 




DEDICATION OF MILL ROAD PUMP STATION 
June 4, 1993 



112 



SEWER COMMISSION 



In 1993 sewer service became available in the 
Domenic Drive Area, Farms I Area, and portions of the 
Warren Avenue Area. These areas have historically 
suffered from severe on-site septic system problems due to 
shallow bedrock and/or high ground water conditions. 

To date, the Chelmsford Sewer Project has: 

Installed over 62 miles of main 
line sewer; 

Built 10 pump stations; and 

Serviced 4,835 homes and 
businesses (43% of 
the town). 

The homes and businesses of Chelmsford have not 
been the only direct beneficiaries of sewer service. 
Numerous municipal properties have been, or will be, 
connected to the system, including: 

EXISTING FUTURE 

Town Hall McCarthy Middle School 

High School South Row School 

Harrington Westlands School 

School Chelmsford Police 

Parker School Department 

Center Fire Simonian Stadium 

House Smith St. Elderly 

North Fire Housing 

House 
Adams Library 
McKay Library 
Highway Garage 
Old Town Half 
McFarlin Manor 

(Elderly Housing) 
Delaney Manor 

(Elcferly Housing) 
Handicap Housing 

(Groton Road) 
Retarded Adult Housing 

(Middlesex St) 



113 



EXISTING FUTURE 

Senior Center 
Highland Avenue 

Affordable Housing 
Mill Road 

Affordable Housing 
Chelmsford Little 

League Fields 
Southwell Field 
Varney Playground 

Sewer service for these properties will eliminate 
older town-owned septic systems, and in the case of 
Chelmsford High School, eliminate their wastewater 
treatment plant. 

The Sewer Commission continues to concentrate its 
efforts on extending lateral sewers to those residential areas 
identified in the 1984 Wastewater Facilities Plan as having 
the greatest need for municipal sewers. The remaining 
areas to be sewered include: 

The Westlands (contracts awarded, 

construction commencement: April, 1994); 
Freeman Lake Area; 
North Road Area; 
Westford Street Area; 
Hart Pond; 
East Chelmsford; 
And approved Petition Areas. 

These areas include approximately 2,841 homes in 
neighborhoods with failing septic systems; septic systems 
which cannot be repairea due to poor soils and/or high 
groundwater; and those within the drinking water aquifer. 
Of the remaining 2,841 individual lots to be sewered, over 
42% have experienced septic system problems. This figure 
is staggering considering the amount of inadequately treated 
sewage still reaching our ground water supply and our 
surface waters. 

Perhaps most troubling, will be the ramifications for 
those homeowners who will not be able to repair their 
septic systems to meet the new code because of existing 
limitations on their property. In light of the severity and 
extent of problems that still exist, and in light of the 
pending changes in the state's sanitary code, it is critical 
that the project continue uninterrupted. 



114 



Upon completion of the program as outlined in the 1984 
Facilities Plan, we will be providing service to 68 % of the 
Town. 

It is anticipated that the state will ratify the pending 
sanitary code changes in 1994. When these regulations are 
in place, the Commission must consider the resulting 
impacts on the remaining 32% of the Town. Therefore, in 
the immediate future, the Sewer Commission will seek 
Town meeting approval to: 

Extend the life of the Sewer Commission beyond the year 
2005, and 

Prepare an updated Wastewater Facilities Plan that 
evaluates changes in the state sanitary code as they 
relate to the remaining 32 % of the Town 
(approximately 3,700 homes) not presently scheduled 
for sewers. 

We are pleased to report that the sewer program to 
date, in excess of $40,000,000 of construction, has 
remained within budget. We continue to experience the 
cost advantages of constructing at a time when the bid 
climate of the construction industry is extremely 
competitive. Also, we are proud of our accomplishments 
in minimizing local project costs by aggressively securing 
maximum available federal and state financial assistance. 

In 1993 the Governor and the Legislature enacted 
legislation establishing the Commonwealth Sewer Rate 
Relief Fund. The Town of Chelmsford was the recipient of 
$38,453 in grants from this fund for Fiscal Year 1994. 
The purpose of the fund is to help mitigate sewer rate 
increases due to debt service obligations for sewer 
construction projects. This legislation was supported by 
legislators (such as Chelmsforcfs Carol Cleven) who were 
seeking equity in state subsidies for communities outside of 
the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority. 



115 



The Commission would like to acknowledge our 
support staff, Evelyn Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy, and 
Gail Loiselle, for their hard work, professionalism and 
patience. Their multifaceted duties are shared by the 
Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works, and 
they are the individuals who interface with the public on a 
daily basis. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 



John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
George F. Abely, Clerk 
Richard J. Day 
Thomas E. Moran 



116 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Members: 

Barbara Scavezze, Chairperson & Solid 

Waste Coordinator 
Allen Beebe 
Catherine Brown 
Norman Eisenmann 
Robert McCallum 

The Town of Chelmsford contracted for the 
following services for residents, funded by taxes: 

- Solid waste collection 

- Recycling collection 

biweekly curbside collection for residents with 
curbside solid waste collection 

central drop-off within complexes which have 
dumpsters Tor solid waste 

- Curbside leaf collections, one in spring, two in fall 

- Leaf drop-off in the fall at the Town Offices 

- Yard waste drop-off at Laughton's Nursery in Westford 

The major accomplishments of the SWAC and Solid 
Waste Coordinator during the past year include: 

- Instituted a corrugated and white paper recycling 
program in the schools 

- Instituted a drop-off program for yard waste at 
Laughton's Nursery in Westford. 

- Produced and mailed three informational flyers to all 
residents communicating the proper methods, timing, 
and places for disposal of various types of recyclable 
material and solid waste. 

- Maintained our on-going emphasis on recycling and solid 
waste reduction programs through our weekly column in 
the Chelmsford Independent and periodic information 
announcements on Cable 43. 



117 



- Continued to staff (along with other volunteers) the 
bimonthly Polystyrene drop-off. 

- Continued to work with other towns on pooling of 
information and resources. 

The SWAC goals for the next year include: 

- rrrTir r :.i 5rt:7.;i::r"5 ::: ne :: e; ::_ nc :.:::. ; i. 
of solid waste, and the collection and marketing of 
recyclable 5 

- Institute a new program to manage brush and woody 
waste, to replace the" drop-off at Laughton's. Laughton 
will continue the leaf and grass composting program. 

- Institute a drop-off for metal items and other recyclables 
not currendv collec:ed at ;i:e curb, to reduce trash 
disposal cos'ts. 

- Increase participation in the recycling program to reduce 
trash disposal costs. 

- Continue to keep residents informed of solid waste and 
recycling issues through weekly articles. Cable 43 
announcements and mformational'flyers. 

- Continue the Polystyrene drop-off. 






113 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and residents 
of the Town of Chelmsford, the annual report of activities 
of the Department of Veterans' Services is submitted. 

Chapter 115 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides for mandated 
services and benefits to veterans and their dependents. The 
local Department of Veterans' Services administers 
financial and medical assistance to eligible needy veterans 
as authorized by the State Office of the Commissioner of 
Veterans' Services. Federal programs and benefits 
provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs 
(VA) are also administered through this office. 

For FY 1993, $77,856.15 was expended in 
Ordinary Benefits and Medical Assistance, of which 75 % 
of that amount is reimbursed to the Town by the 
Commonwealth. Currently, there are 19 open cases of 
Chelmsford veterans receiving State benefits. The caseload 
has varied from 20-30 cases in the past year. There are 
over 50 cases receiving Federal benefits directly from the 
VA. The Town of Westford shares 40% of the expenses in 
the operation of the new District Office of Veterans' 
Services with the Town of Chelmsford. 

In addition to providing financial and medical 
assistance to veterans of the Town, the Department of 
Veterans' Services provides burial assistance, employment 
counseling and direction to state and federally funded jobs 
programs, family and substance abuse counseling and crisis 
intervention, and housing, food and fuel assistance. The 
Director of Veterans' Services Agents' Association, the 
Middlesex County Veterans' Services Agents' Association, 
and serves as liaison between the towns and the 
Chelmsford-Westford Veterans' Council, who represent the 
veterans' service organization sin the towns, i.e., the 
American Legion, VFW, DAV, etc. 

The newly-formed District Office of the Department 
of Veterans' Services serves both towns of Westford and 
Chelmsford. William Hahn is the Director of Veterans' 
Services and can be reached in either town by calling 251- 
0123. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

William L. Hahn 
Director, Veterans' Services 



119 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The Committee did not receive any applications for 
assistance from Veterans of World War II during the year 
1993. 

The total funds on deposit in a local bank were 
$18,557.05. Interest in the amount of $708.18 was earned 
during the year. 

Applications for assistance usually come from the 
Veterans Agent of the Veterans' Benefits Department. 

Since the fund was established during 1947 many 
Veterans of World War II have been assisted. Assistance is 
always given in the form of Material Grants. The 
Committee has not approved the payment of Cash Grants. 

One member of the Committee, Mr. Thomas F. 
Balfrey, did resign due to illness. We do want to 
acknowledge his part willingness to serve on the 
Committee. 

Present members; one from each voting precinct, 
are listed as follows: 



PRECINCT: 




1 


Steven E.C. Belkakis, DDS 


2 


Carl Lebedzinski 


3 


James J. Walker 


4 


John J. McNulty 


5 


George F. Waite 


6 


Alfred H. Coburn 


7 


Robert T. Clough 


8 


Neal C. Stanley 


9 


Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 



The Committee members extend their appreciation to 
the various town officials who have assisted the Committee 
in the past. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 



12 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager 



January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993 $17,848.87 

Balance on Hand as of 1/1/1993: 
Add Receipts: 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $459.30 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $248.88 



Total Interest Received: $708. 1 8 



Balance on Hand as of 12/31/1883: $18,557.05 

ASSETS 

MassBank for Savings, Acct. #911287909 $12,841.01 

MassBank for Savings, Acct. #2055696 $5,716.04 

Total Assets $18,557.05 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities $ None 



Total Assets, less Liabilities, as of 
December 3 1 , 1 993 $18,557.05 



Respectfully Sumitted: 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS ' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



121 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN ELECTION APRIL 6, 1993 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town 
of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, VIZ: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gym 

Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gym 

Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gym 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gym 

Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 6th day of April, 1993 being the first 
Tuesday in said month at 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for 
the following purposes: 

To bring their votes for the following officers: 

One Town Moderator for three years 

One Selectman for three years 



122 



Two Members of School Committee for three years 

Three members of Public Library Trustees for three 
years 

Two Planning Board Members for three years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Member of Board of Health for three years 

Two Sewer Commissioners for three years 

To bring in their vote for the election of 162 Town Meeting 
Members, 18 representatives per precinct, for terms based 
on election results as stated in the charter as follows: 

The first third in order of votes received shall serve 
for three years; the second third of such order shall 
serve for two years and the remaining third in such 
order shall server for one year from the date of the 
annual town election. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy School Gymnasium on 
Monday, the twenty-sixth day of April, at 7:30 p.m. in 
the evening then and there to act upon the following 
articles, VIZ: 



123 






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128 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 26, 1993 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 
7:35 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium, by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 155 Representative 
Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator then asked for a moment of silence 
for two former Town Employees who had passed away. 
Warren C. Lahue who had been a longtime member and 
Chairman of the Finance Committee died March 22, 1993. 
Also James F. Dunigan Sr., who had been the Town 
Highway Superintendent, died April 13, 1993. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and posting of the 
warrant be waived. The Moderator asked Tor a show of 
hands, it was so voted unanimously. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the reading 
of the entire warrant be waived. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands, it was so voted unanimously. 

The Moderator then asked permission from the 
Body to allow Mary Mahoney, Director of the Library, 
who is a non resident to speak concerning the Library 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, it was 
so voted unanimously. 

The Moderator opened the meeting by showing 
where all the exits were within the gym and briefly 
explained the procedures used during the meeting, and 
pointed out the non voting section. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved to hear reports 57 the Town Officers and 
Committees. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch stated that there 
were no reports to be heard at this time. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the town vote to instruct its representatives to 
the General Court to support an amendment to the FY "94 
State budget to guarantee that Cities and Towns receive the 
full $47 million growth in lottery revenues. 



129 



Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, explained that this 
was Legislation filed by the Mass Municipal Association 
regarding all cities and towns in Massachusetts receiving 
their full portion of money due from the sale of lottery 
revenues. 

The Board of Selectmen was in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the town vote to instruct its representatives to 
the General Court to support legislation filed by the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association that would establish 
in state law a Local Roads Fund in order to ensure a fair 
and predictable share of state gas tax collections for 
distribution to cities and towns for use on local roads. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, explained that this 
was an amendment to the state budget filed by the Mass 
Municipal Association. 

The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town in a certain parcel of land 
on Mallory Street, shown as Lots 17 and 23 on Assessor's 
Map 45, containing 4250 and 5000 square feet more or less 
respectively. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, explained that this 
article as well as articles five and six pertains to Town 
owned land. Different people have expressed interest in 
purchasing the land mentioned in these articles. All of the 
land will oe put out for competitive bid. The assessed 
value of lot 17 is $3,100.00 and for lot 23 $3900.00. The 
Board of Selectmen was in favor of the article. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, a 
2/3' s vote is needed. The following tellers came forward 
and a hand count was taken: 



13 



Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Jean 
Horgan. The result of the hand count Yes 139 No 1 94 is 
2/3 's the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel of land 
on Mallory Street shown as Lot 15 on Assessor's Map 45 
containing 5,000 square feet more or less. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. 
The assessed value is $4 048.00. This too will be put out 
for bid. The Board of Selectmen was in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Board or 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel of land 
off Maple Road as set forth in a plan to be filed in the 
Town Engineer's Office, containing 26,548 square feet 
more or less and more particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at an (LP.) at the most Easterly point of 
land of Tech Ridge Inc., abutting the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on M.N.R.D. Book of Plans 
89, Plan 102A and thence; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, (90.36') to an (LP.) thence; 

By an interior angle, of (65°-13"-30") by land of the 
Town of Chelmsford, (56.94') to an (LP.) 
thence; 

By an interior angle, of (265°-54'-50") by land of 
the Town of Chelmsford, (142.47') to an (LP.) 
thence; 

By an interior angle of (220°-42'-30') by land of the 
Town of Chelmsford (140.74') to an (LP.) 
thence; 



131 



By an interior angle of (103°-17'50") by land of the 
Town Chelmsford (50.00') to a point thence; 

By an interior angle of (105°) (180') to a point 
thence; 

By an interior angle of (89°-55'-05") (330.42*) to 
an (LP.) and the point of beginning; containing 
26,548 square feet of land more or less. 

This vote authorizing the Board of Selectmen to 
convey said parcel is contingent upon a favorable vote of 
the School Committee pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 15 
and further contingent upon the acquisition of an easement 
for access to remaining Town property by emergency 
vehicles over said parcel and adjacent lancT fronting on 
Maple Avenue. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. 
The estimated value of the land at this time is between 
$5,000 to $7,000. An actual assessment will be made 
available for the bidding process. A Question was asked 
regarding the type of business located near the Byam 
School and what would the land be used for. The Town 
Manger said it would be used for future parking which 
would then enable the business to expand their front portion 
of their building. The Board of Selectmen was in favor of 
the article. The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion, motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Dennis Ready moved to 
waive the detail reading of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried, 
unanimously. William Dalton then came forward and 
explained the article. This would allow in the event of a 
layoff that only the actual time accrued while working only 
in Chelmsford would be counted towards seniority. It 
doesn't matter where the firefighter lives. He gave an 
example that if a firefighter who worked for ten years in 
the Town of Westford was laid off then came to work in 
Chelmsford for five years, according to the present Civil 
Service Law that firefighter would nave a total of fifteen 
years in seniority. If a layoff occurred in Chelmsford and 
the choice came down to the firefighter with the total Civil 
Service years of fifteen (ten from Westford and five from 



132 






Chelmsford) vs the firefighter who only had a total of seven 
years (all seven years worked in Chelmsford) of Civil 
Service then the firefighter with the higher amount of 
years or service regardless of where they were earned 
would maintain the position. The union members felt that 
the firefighter who worked the most number of years in 
Chelmsford should have the seniority. The total years in 
Civil Service shouldn't be taken into consideration. It 
should be the amount of years worked for the Town of 
Chelmsford as a firefighter. Selectman Lawlor questioned 
what was the difference between the wording that appears 
on the warrant vs the wording of this motion. William 
Dalton explained that this will protect any disable Veteran 
who applies. This is according to state law that was passed 
in 19SQ and the wording was not included in the original 
article. A question was asked why this was not part of the 
wording in contract negotiations. Due to the Civil Service 
Law being a state law any city or town which accepts the 
Civil Service Law must abide by it. This would only apply 
to the Firefighters and not the Police Department. It the 
Police want the same type of protection then they would 
have to petition the Legislation and amend the wording to 
include them. Selectmen Brem moved to reconsideration 
the motion to waive the reading of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote on the motion to reconsider. 
Motion carried by a show of hands. The Moderator asked 
for a vote on the motion to waive the reading of the article. 
Motion defeated by a show of hands, he then read the 
article in its entirety. More questions were asked. One 
issue was the possibility that this would limit the work 
force to only Chelmsford residents. It didn't matter where 
a firefighter lived, only the years of service with the Town 
not the Civil Service system was the issue. Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Finance Committee was not in 
favor. More discussion took place. William Keohane 
spoke in favor of the article citing another example of the 
Civil Service Law process. If a person worked as a clerk 
typist under Civil Service for five years, then took the 
firefighter's exam and qualified and became a firefighter 
and worked for two years in Chelmsford, the following 
could happen. If a layoff was to take place according to 
seniority, then that person would be able to add the five 
years as a clerk typist along with the two years employed as 



133 



a firefighter and have a total of seven years of seniority. 
The person who worked for three years as a firefighter in 
Chelmsford with no other Civil Service would then be laid 
off. The members of the Firefighter Association want to 
keep the seniority within their organization. He then 
moved to amend the article by rewording the title of the 
Act: Relative to Reduction In Force for Employees of the 
Fire Force of the Town of Chelmsford. The Moderator 
asked for a vote on the motion to amend by a show of 
hands, motion carried. Michael Bahia moved to amend 
section one of the article by substituting the following after 
the words "inserting inplace thereof" the following words: 
and for the purpose of separating of permanent employees 
from service onsaid fire force, seniority shall be based on 
length of service by title in the fire force of any city or 

Town with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts subject 

to the Civil Service Law Chapter 31, excluding service in 
any other departmental unit of the Town of Chelmsford, 
any other Town or city, or the Commonwealth, and shall 
be reinstated in said fire force according to such seniority. 
The Moderator asked for the Selectmen s recommendation. 
The Board of Selectmen did not recommend the motion to 
amend. The Finance Committee was not in favor of the 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend, Motion defeated. The 
Moderator then asked for a show of hands of the article as 
amended, motion carried and the article reads as follows: 

William F. Dalton moved that the town vote to 
petition the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to amend the following Massachusetts 
General Laws, pertaining to Civil Service Law Chapter 31, 
as follows: 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO REDUCTION IN FORCE FOR 
EMPLOYEES OF THE FIRE FORCE OF THE TOWN 
OF CHELMSFORD. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, 
as follows: 

SECTION 1. Section 1 of chapter 47 of the acts of 1990 is 
hereby amended by inserting after the words 
"Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special 
law or rule to the contrary," the following words "and 
subject to paragraph six of section 26 of Chapter 31 , " 



134 



SECTION 2. said chapter 47 is hereby further amended 
striking out in lines three through ten, the words 
"provided, however, that this section shall apply only to 
reductions in force resulting in demotions from above the 
lowest title on such force to the next lowest title or titles in 
succession and shall not affect the seniority of any 
employee in service for any other purpose, including, but 
not limited to "and inserting in place thereof the following 
words: "and for the purposes of separation of permanent 
employees from service on such fire force, seniority shall 
be based on length of service by title in the fire force of the 
town of Chelmsford, excluding service in any other 
departmental unit of the Town or Chelmsford or any other 
town or city or the Commonwealth, and shall be reinstated 
in said fire force according to such seniority. " 

SECTION 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Evelyn Thoren moved that the 
town vote to adopt the following resolution relative to the 
current acting being undertaken T>y the Chelmsford Public 
School System to formulate an HIV/AIDS Prevention 
Program to become an integral part of the Kindergarten 
through Twelfth Grade curriculum: 

WHEREAS the HIV/AIDS virus is acknowledged to be a 
life-threatening infectious disease and as such, can be 
accorded objective, academic instruction to inform students 
as to its nature and danger, and 

WHEREAS the HIV/AIDS virus is generally recognized as 
falling under the category of a social disease, and 

WHEREAS the mechanics of actually disseminating the 
medical facts relating to the infection are subject to the 
originator's subjective, personal system of moral and 
ethical values, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED that: 

any HIV/AIDS Prevention Program as may be proposed 
and/or adopted by leadership of the Chelmsford Public 
School System shall: 



135 



1. be implemented as a specific, structured course of 
instruction, i.e. as opposed to being carried on as 
a comprehensive program with HIV/AIDS 
information dispersed throughout the entire 
curriculum of the Chelmsford School System, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that: 

2. the citizenry of the Town of Chelmsford shall 
have ready access to a detailed scope and sequence 
of the program to be offered for its examination 
and study, and 

3. any such program shall not set forth a mandatory 
requirement for students to successfully complete 
it as a prerequisite for promotion or final 
graduation, and finally 

4. any such program shall only be attended by 
students who produce a letter of approval to 
attend, signed by their respective legal parents (s) 
or guardian (s) , i.e. a failure to receive such 
written communication from a parent or guardian 
shall not be understood to be tacit approval for the 
student in question to be required to attend; 

George Ballweg spoke about the article. He explained that 
this article is a civil rights issue, not an educational issue. 
This is being put forth as a non binding resolution by the 
Concern Citizens of Chelmsford. Parents historically had 
the right to determine the moral and ethical guidance of 
their children when it comes to choosing certain programs. 
A discussion took place. The Board of Selectmen were not 
in favor of the article, they felt that it infringed on the 
jurisdiction of the School Committee. The Finance 
Committee was not in favor of the article. More discussion 
took place. John Emerson asked if this article passes does 
the School Committee have any type of obligation to follow 
it. Town Counsel James Harrington explained that this is a 
resolution that is non-binding policy. The School 
Committee is not legally obligated to follow it. Bradford 
Emerson moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands which left the chair in 
doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken. 



13 6 



The result of the count was: Yes 135 No 5 2/3' s is 93 
motion carried to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the article, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Finance Committee member 
D wight Hay ward, moved that the town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article II Section 2.2 PUBLICATIONS 
by deleting section 2.2 which reads as follows in its 
entirety: 

2.2 PUBLICATIONS - The warrant article shall be 
included in the Finance committee report which shall be 
made available to Town Meeting Members and the public 
not less than two (2) weeks before either Town Meeting. 
The warrant articles for any Special Town Meeting shall be 
made available to the Town Meeting Members not less than 
fourteen (14) days before the Special Town Meeting. 

And add the following Section 2.2: 

2.2 PUBLICATIONS - The warrant article shall be 
included in the Finance Committee report which shall be 
made available to Town Meeting Members and the public 
not less than one (1) week before either Annual Town 
Meeting. The warrant articles for any Special Town 
Meeting shall be made available to the Town Meeting 
Members not less than fourteen (14) days before the Special 
Town Meeting. 

Cheryl Boss, Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
explained that the purpose of this article was to give the 
Finance Committee more time in order to have all the 
correct information needed before the book went to press. 
Right now the Committee must have the book published 
two weeks prior to the Town Meeting. Sometimes all the 
information isn't available and when corrections have to be 
made it looks like found money. The Committee felt that 
given the extra week of time, a more up to date book would 
be produced. She went on to explain that once it is 
published, the book is available at the Town Office 
3uilding. The cost for mailing the book out is almost 
$2.00 per book, which would be an unnecessary expense of 
$400.00 per year because of the two Town Meetings each 
year. The Finance Committee meetings and the School 
Committee meetings are all opened to the public. Any 
representative can attend these meetings if they feel that 
more information is needed prior to the publishing of the 



137 



book. Also rough drafts are made available upon requests, 
of any budget. The Board of Selectmen were in favor or 
the article. A discussion took place. A number of 
representatives spoke against the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, the article was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, John P. Emerson moved that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent 
domain, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and 
shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of Sewer Easements 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Phase IIIA Sewers, prepared 
for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission by Richard F. 
Kaminski & Associates, Inc," a copy of which is on file in 
the office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein 
by references, for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John P. 
Emerson Jr. , explained that this is a standard article and 
asked for support. The Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 1 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Home 
Rule Charter Under Part II Legislative Branch/ 
Representative Town Meeting Section 2.5 Vacancies (c) 
forfeiture of Office by adding the following paragraph: 

Any town meeting member who shall fail to attend 
more than one-half of the sessions of the town 
meeting held in a calendar year, may appeal the 
declaration of vacancy by requesting a hearing on 
removal. A request for hearing shall be in writing 
and shall be filed with the Town Clerk on or before 
January 15th of the following calendar year, A 
hearing shall be held before a committee consisting 
of the Town Clerk, Town Moderator and Town 
Counsel to be held no later that January 25th of said 
year. Upon the showing of good cause by the 






13 8 






member, the committee may excuse one or more 
absences and may rescind the Declaration of 
Vacancy provided the Town meeting member has 
attended at least one-half of the unexcused sessions 
of the Town Meeting during said calendar year. 

Town Counsel James Harrington explained the 
article. This would allow an representative who is removed 
from the position due to lack of attendance a chance to 
appeal. Presently, according to the Charter a 
representative must attend more than one half or the 
meetings held in a calendar year. If there are six meetings 
held, then representatives must attend four out of six 
meetings. Rather than allow the remaining representatives 
in a precinct conduct a hearing and vote on a decision, it 
was felt that the positions mentioned in the article, were the 
most non-political. Nothing would be gained or lost by 
these three people reviewing the appeal. If the 
representatives were allowed, there is a possibility that a 
decision wouldn't necessary be a fair one, because the 
person involved may not be popular among the 
representatives, or the next person on the reserve list may 
be more qualified in some opinions. Therefore the 
Moderator, Town Counsel and the Town Clerk would make 
the decision. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Finance Committee was not. Nobody should 
make a decision one way or the other. They felt that the 
representative could always run again at the next election 
and in reality only be out of office for four months. A 
discussion took place. A Number of representatives spoke 
in favor of the article. Catherine Brown submitted a 
motion to amend which was declared out of order by Town 
Counsel. William Dal ton moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator then 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 The Moderator read the 
article then feeling that he may have a conflict stepped 
down as Moderator, and Town Counsel James Harrington 
presided over the meeting as the Acting Moderator. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter 
under Part II Legislative Branch/ Representative 
Town Meeting Section 2.9 Participations 



139 



by Non-Town Meeting Members Subsection (b) 
Representatives of Town Agencies by adding the 
following paragraph: 

"Any Elected or appointed Town Official may 
submit a motion under any warrant article pertaining 
to matters within their purview". 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Richard 
DeFreitas explained the purpose of the article, and also 
stated that Selectman Lawlor was making a motion to 
amend the article on his behalf, which was the point of this 
whole article. The Acting Moderator read the motion to 
amend. Any Elected or appointed Board or The Town 

Manager may submit He went on and explained that it 

could oe possible that at some point a board or committee 
may not nave a member who also is a representative town 
meeting member, therefore that board would not be able to 
submit any motions on their behalf. A Discussion followed. 
It was asked why this was not addressed in the Charter. 
The intent was to keep the separation of executive and 
legislation powers. The Finance Committee was not in 
favor of the motion or the article. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor. More discussion took place. Barry Balan 
moved the question to stop debate. The Acting Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
The Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands on tne 
main motion, motion defeated. 

Moderator Dennis McHugh returned to the podium 
and presided over the meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 48 of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1992, an Act 
concerning Early Retirement Incentive. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that is a 
piece of state legislation that is being used throughout the 
state. It had been previously approved last October by the 
representatives, however, at that time the Middlesex 
County Retirement System was deemed not in full 
compliance with the law. This will be a cost savings for 
the Town. It will reduce the total personnel and fill certain 
needed positions with a less expensive employee. It will 
also make way for the reorganization of departments. 



140 



The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Kathleen moved to postpone 
this article to Thursday April 29, 1993, and be the first 
article of business, after the posted special. Susan Olsen 
moved to adjourn the meeting until Thursday. She 
explained that she felt that the discussion may go over the 
1 1:00 PM curfew. Tom Moran spoke against the motion to 
adjourn. He felt that the article shouldn t be postpone until 
another night, and he did not want to adjourn the meeting 
at this time as he felt that the article should be heard. John 
Coppinger stated that there has been enough discussion in 
the past on the subject of beavers and he wanted to vote on 
the article tonight. The Selectmen were in favor of 
continuing the meeting. The Finance Committee supported 
the Selectmen on wanting to continue the meeting. The 
Moderator asked for a snow of hands on the motion to 
adjourn. Motion defeated. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to postpone the article. 
Adrienne Jerome spoke in favor of postponing the article. 
She explained that a Representative from the Friends of the 
Animals Association would be flying in Thursday night and 
be available at that time to answer any and all questions. 
Brad Emerson moved the question. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on stopping debate. The Chair was in 
doubt, the tellers came forward and conducted a hand 
count: Yes 131 No 1 2/3 's is 88, motion carried. 

Kathleen Hillman moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General Bylaws Article VI Police Regulations by 
adding the following: 

Section 22 Prohibition of Trapping by means of the 
Leghold and conibear trap on Private and public Lands 
without the written permission of the Property owner. 

1 . It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any person to set, 
trigger, activate, or otherwise cause to be set, triggered, 
activated or use any type or modification of any steel 
jawed leghold trap including the soft catch trapping 
system, or any form of jaw trap or conibear trap, for 
the capture of any animal without the written permission 



141 



of the property owner carried on the trapper's person. 
This written permission is to be renewed yearly. 
Public lands would require the written permission of 
the department head who oversees said land. 

2. The definition set forth in general law chapter 131, 
section 1 of "to Trap", as saia act applies to fur bearing 
mammals, are incorporated herewith. 

3. The Police Department and or animal control officer of 
Chelmsford, shall be authorized to enforce this by-law 
pursuant to Article 1 of Town of Chelmsford General 
by-laws. 

4. The Fine for each violation of this section shall be three 
hundred dollars ($300.00), with each violation 
constituting a separate offense. Said violations shall be 
punishable as provided in Article 1 of Town of 
Chelmsford by-laws. 

Kathleen Hillman explained the article. She 
explained that this a property rights not an animal rights by- 
law. This would allow her to say no trapping is allowed on 
her property, unless the trapper has written permission. 
Presently any trapper is allowed to trap on any land that is 
not posted during the trapping season of November to 
February. A discussion took place. Adrienne Jerome, 
Thomas Christiano and Eleanor Abbott spoke in favor of 
the article and Jointly answered questions from the Body. 
A number of Representatives spoke against the article. 
Even though the proponents said it was a property right, the 
Representatives questioned why a person from the Friends 
of the Animals was willing to come before them and speak 
about the issue. It was asked if there were any reports of 
trappers causing damage or accidents with the trapping. No 
statistics could oe given. It was stated that if any type of 
by-law is passed then the trappers will not come to 
Chelmsford and the beaver population will return. The 
Moderator asked for the Selectmen's recommendation. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The 
Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion. 
Kathleen Hillman moved to amend the article by decreasing 
the fine of $300.00 to read $100.00. The Selectmen were 
in favor of the motion to amend. The Finance Committee 



142 



had no recommendation. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the motion to amend. Motion carried. Dennis 
Ready moved the question to stop debate. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the main motion as amended, motion defeated. 

Michael McCall moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Thursday night April 29, 1993, at the McCarthy Middle 
School Gymnasium. The meeting will continue after the 
conclusion of the posted Special Town Meeting. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 1 1:20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



143 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 29, 1993 

The Moderator Dennis E. McHugh called the 
Special Town Meeting to order at 7:44 PM. At the 
McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium. He recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 149 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator pointed out the exits located within 
the Gym, and went over the procedures of Town Meeting. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously by a 
show of hands. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously, by a show of hands. 

The Moderator made an announcement that 
Thursday May 6, 1993 was the Annual Student 
Government Day at Chelmsford High. The Students were 
here tonight and he read the list of students and their 
positions. 



Selectman 



Town Manger 
Town Clerk 
School Committee 

Supt of Schools 
Housing Authority 
Sewer Commission 



Edward Kalpas 
Andrea Polychrones 
Karen Ready 
Tracy Sullivan 
Kenneth MacPhail, 
Chairman 

Eric Karr 

Amy Shattuck 

Kathleen Ahern 

Shirazeh Tabibi 

Lee Ablove 

Mark Perriello, Chairman 

Djwan Scott 

Matthew Metivier 

Jeff Metivier 
Aaron Robinson 
Keith MacPhail 



144 



Planning Board 

Board of Health 

Cemetery Commission 

Cemetery Supt 
Library Trustee 



Treasurer/Tax Coll 
Finance Director 

Board of Assessors 



Town Accountant 
Finance Committee 

Police Chief 
Deputy Police Chief 
Fire Chief 
Deputy Fire Chief 
DPW Dir Town Engin. 
Supt of Streets 
Building Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Town Constable 
Town Moderator 



Colleen Gleason 
Kerry MacDonald 
Katnna Often 

Joseph Balan 
Erin Littlefield 
Jaimie Russo 

Desiree Elias 
Marny White 
Tim McMaster 

Greg Marcks 

Kristen Kidder 
Julie Waszack 



Kate Peterson 

Mike Phillips 
Andy Rubenstein 
Chris Sanford 

Joe Lemay 

Kevin Scanlon 
Matthew Amerson 
Elizabeth Parker 

Ryan Hirt 

Jeff Saviano 

Jennifer Pattison 

Jen Durkin 

Jeremy Quimby 

John Pollard 

Lindsay Wells 

Brian McKay 

Chris Parke 

Steven Moore 



145 



Council on Aging Jeremy Davis 

Veteran's Agent Steph Wagemaker 

State Rep. Christina Egan 

State Senator Aaron Bates 

The Town Meeting body greeted the students with a 
round of applause. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to amend the zoning by-law 
under Article II District Regulations Section 2300 Use 
Regulation Schedule by adding under Business Uses the 
following use: 

RA RB RC CA CB CC CD IA 
IS RMH CX P OS 

Food Catering Ser P(4)P(4)P(4) P(4) 

and further to amend Article V. Definitions by adding the 

following definition: 

Food Catering Services: An establishment which prepares 

and sells prepared foods to customers in bulk to serve a 

minimum of 20 people for consumption at a location off the 

premises. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the 
Old Town Hall is a building that the town leases space to 
businesses. He cited the annual cost for maintaining the 
building is why he felt that the catering service would be an 
asset as a tenant and that is why he wanted the CX zone 
amended to allow catering service, this would help make 
the building self sufficient. However, after talking with the 
proposed caterer it was decided that the amount required 
for rent could not be met. As a result the motion to rezone 
the site will be withdrawn. Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved to withdraw the article. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the motion. The Finance Committee was 
in favor. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Robert P. Jovce, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
Debt and Interest Line Item 33 of the FY93 Budget the sum 
of $100,000.00 to Line Item 8 Public Safety Personnel 
Services. 



146 



Town Manager Lynch explained the article. This 
had been slated for the October Meeting last year, in order 
to fund the Fire Contract. The article was withdrawn with 
the idea that the Department would not need the money. A 
number of items have since come up therefore the money is 
still needed to avoid a shortfall in the budget. The 
Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The Finance 
Committee supported the motion with the understanding 
that the Town is not anticipating any borrowing between 
now and the new year. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
the 1991 Transportation Bond Issue as set forth in Chapter 
33 of the Acts of 1991, the sum of $479,646.00 for the 
purpose of Chapter 90 Expenditures. 

Town Manger Bernard Lynch explained that this is a 
requirement by the State in order to receive monies for 
Chapter 90 projects in FY94. 

The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no other business at hand the 
Moderator declared the Special Town Meeting closed at 
7:56 PM and moved immediately back into the annual. 

The Moderator opened the Adjourned Annual Town 
Meeting at 7:57 PM. He announce that Cheryl Boss who 
was the Chairman of the Finance Committee will be leaving 
the committee after eleven years of service, and thanked 
her for her work. The Body gave her a round of applause. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Library Trustee D. Lorraine 
Lambert moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell pursuant to the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 30B a painting known 
as "Amos Adams", and further to designate and restrict the 
use of any funds received from said sale to Public Library 
Building Needs. 



147 



Library Trustee Member Elizabeth McCarthy 
explained the history of the painting and what the trustees 
hoped to do with the proceeds obtained from the sale of the 
painting. The money would go into a separate fund for the 
Library Building Needs. The Trustees felt that they would 
be taking a cultural aspect of the Town and transferring it 
to another cultural aspect to be used by the Town. 

The Board of Selectman recommended the article. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. A 
question was asked concerning the painting decreasing or 
increasing in value. Elizabeth McCarthy said that the value 
has dropped since first appraised in 1985. Bernard Ready 
spoke against the motion. Mike Sockol spoke in favor of 
the article. The proceeds will be of greater use then the 
picture itself. Jeff Stallard moved to amend the article by 
adding: A condition of the sale shall be that a copy of the 
"Adams" Painting be made at or prior to the time of sale. 
The Board of Selectmen had no recommendation on the 
motion. The Finance Committee felt that an amendment 
was not needed. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. He then asked 
for a show of hands on the main motion, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Library Trustee D. Lorraine 
Lambert moved tEat the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate the sum of $41,671.00 from the Library 
Endowment Funds, transfer and appropriate the sum of 
$37,075.00 from the Sale of Town Owned Land, and 
borrow the sum of $281,254.00 for a total appropriation of 
$360,000.00 and to authorize the Town Manager to 
negotiate the purchase price of the real property with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of 
purchasing real property consisting of land with buildings 
thereon located at 10 Bartlett Street, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts for Public Library purposes. 

Library Trustee D. Lorraine Lambert explained the 
motion. She gave a history of the land in question. The 
Town had a opportunity to purchase this land in the past 
and was turned down by the Town Meeting Body. This 
would be used for the possibility of future expansion. Both 
the Library Trustees and the Site Committee agree that this 
is the best location. There is 1.44 of an acre involved, the 
Board is hoping to purchase two other parcels of land 
which would allow for the parking of one hundred cars. 



148 



The assessed value of the land is $420,000.00. She asked 
for support of the article. Questions were asked about the 
site. Also if the Town decided to build at another site 
would the representatives have the chance to vote to do so 
or is the Town locked into this site? The Town Manager 
explained that wherever the site would be the Town 
Meeting Body would have to vote for the funding of the 
construction. Could the land be taken by eminent domain, 
if the seller didn't want to sell the property at the appraised 
price. That avenue would be explored if need be. What 
would happen to the "Pink House". The Town Manager 
explained that presently there is no buyer in mind for any 
of the houses on the site, but the houses would be moved if 
possible. The Moderator asked for the Board of 
Selectmen's recommendation. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Finance Committee was 
in favor. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into 
compensatory balance agreements, during Fiscal Year 
1994, as permitted by General Laws Chapter 44, Section 
53F. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is 
to allow the Town Treasurer to make arrangements to 
deposit the Town's money into certain banks in return for 
services. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$18,000.00 from the sale of the Graves and Lots to 
Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is 
a annual part of the Budget. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Finance Committee supported 
the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 



149 



UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved dismiss the article. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that there 
were no late bills. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. UNDER ARTICLE 

20 Samuel Poulten moved that the Town vote to 
accept the provisions of Section 12 of Chapter 188 of the 
Acts of 1985, the School Improvement Act, in relation to 
the Equal Educational Opportunity Grant in the amount of 
$17,207.00 for the Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
for the 1993-94 School Year. 

Samuel Poulten explained that this is a necessary 
item. The five other towns involved must also vote the 
same article. This maybe the last time, the Town has been 
voting on this since 1985. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Sewer Commission 
Chairman, John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the Town 
vote to transfer a sum of $1,000,000.00 from Sewer 
Betterments, Special Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion 
of debt and interest in the Fiscal Year 1994 budget. 

Sewer Commission Chairman, John P. Emerson 
explained the article. This is the third time that the Town 
has voted for this, its an annual item. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53D 
"Recreation and Park Self-Supporting Service Revolving 
Funds" 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
would allow the Recreation Department to be self 
sufficient. The Board of Selectmen recommended the 
article. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



150 



UNDER ARTICLE 23 Conservation Member, 
David McLachlan moved that the Town vote to transfer the 
sum of $2,500.00 from Conservation fees under wetlands 
Special Reserve Fund to reduce the Conservation 
Commission Budget Fiscal Year 1994. 

The Town Manger Bernard Lynch explained that 
this would enable the Conservation Commission to reduce 
their FY94 budget by $2,500.00 and put the monies 
towards Reservation Management. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Finance Committee was 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the sum 
of $21,500.00 to engage a private accounting firm to 
prepare an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town Manager explained that because the 
Town receives alot of federal money it is required that an 
audit be done. The Town also includes all the Town 
budgets and this is done on a yearly basis. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the sand lease 
approved by the Town under Article 12 of the 1989 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a yearly 
article. The Town has a ten year lease for the cost or sancf. 
The price is half the cost of the market price. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Michale Sokol asked to take articles 27, 29, and 30 
out of order and then return to Article 26 which is the 
budget. This would allow more time to be spent on the 
budget. The Board of Selectmen recommended the motion. 
The Finance Committtee was not in favor of taking any 
articles out of order. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 



151 



UNDER ARTICLE 27 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, 
the sum of $12,500.00 for the purpose of providing Senior 
Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for services 
rendered, pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by the 
Council on Aging and approved by the Town Manager. 

Town Manger Bernard Lynch explained that this 
was a program started last year that was successful. A lot 
of Senior Citizens took advantage of working for the Town 
and putting the money earned towards their taxes. 
However, the activity was not as high as anticipated, 
therefore not as much money is being requested for this 
year. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee recommend the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Finance Committee Member 
Dwight Hayward moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate, the sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a 
Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Cheryl Boss 
explained that this is money that is put aside and used for 
non-anticipated emergency items. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 John Emerson moved that 
the reading of the article be waived. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. Town 
Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. There are 
three items that are changed from the current by-law. A 
fine of $100.00 will be charged for unauthorized parking in 
a handicap spot. This fine is in accordance with state 
statute. The permit is to be issued for 180 days where 
presently the by-law reads sixty days. The final change is 
that the unauthorized use of the permit will be a fine of 
$100.00 which is an increase of $50.00. A discussion took 
place. Some Representatives felt that the Fine of $100.00 
for parking in a nandicap space was high. What could be 
done if in fact a ticket was issued and there was a legitimate 
reason. Police Chief Raymond McKeon came forth and 
explained that there was a hearing process in which a 



152 



person could protest a ticket. If the reason was accepted 
then the fine would be waived. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Finance Committee was 
in favor of the article. Harry Foster moved to amend the 
article to reflect a lower fine for parking in a handicap 
space. Amend the dollar amount from $15.00 (current 
amount) to $50.00. He felt that this was a fair amount. 
The Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the motion to 
amend. The Finance Committee was not in favor of the 
motion to amend. A number of Representatives spoke in 
favor of leaving the amount as original presented with the 
figure of $100.00. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. He then 
asked for a show of hands on the main motion, motion 
carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-laws Article VI Section 20 
Prohibition on Unauthorized Parking in Designated 
Handicapped Parking Spaces in private or Public Ways "By 
deleting paragraphs 2.7. and 8 which read as follows in 
their entirety: 

2. A fine of $15.00 shall be imposed for the 
unauthorized parking of a motor vehicle in a 
space reserved and designated for use by 
vehicles of handicapped persons, pursuant to the 
authority of Chapter 90, Section 20C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

7. Any motor vehicle bearing a handicapped 
parkins permit or motor vehicle registration 
plate designating the vehicle as one used by a 
handicapped person shall be authorized to park 
in a designated handicapped parking space. The 
Chief of Police, his designee, or the Town 
Clerk may issue a temporary handicapped 
Parking Permit to any person upon application 
with supporting medical affidavit signed by a 
licensed physician designating the applicant as 
physically handicapped. Said temporary permit 
shall be issued with an expiration date not to 
exceed sixty (60) days from the date of issue 
and shall be displayed in front right windshield 
of any vehicle parked in a designated 
handicapped parking space. 



153 



8. The unauthorized use of a temporary permit 
shall be punishable by a fine or $50.00. 

and add the following paragraphs 2,7, and 8: 

2. A fine of $100.00 shall be imposed for the 
unauthorized parking of a motor vehicle in a 
space reserved ana designated for use by 
vehicles of handicapped persons, pursuant to the 
authority of Chapter 40, Section 21 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

7. Any motor vehicle bearing a handicapped 
parking permit or motor vehicle registration 
plate designating the vehicle as one used by a 
handicapped person shall be authorized to park 
in a designated handicapped parking space. The 
Chief of Police, his designee, or the Town 
Clerk may issue a temporary handicapped 
Parking Permit to any person upon application 
with supporting medical affidavit signed by a 
licensed physician designating the applicant as 
physically handicapped. Said temporary permit 
shall be issued with an expiration date not to 
exceed one hundred eighty (180) days from the 
date of issue and shall be displayed in front 
right windshield of any vehicle parked in a 
designated handicapped parking space. 

8. The unauthorized use of a temporary permit 
shall be punishable by a fine of $1()0.00. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
such sums of money as may be required to defray Town 
charges for the fiscal period July 1, 1993 to June 30, 1994. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch gave an explanation 
of the budget and showed a cnart which reflected the 
spending trends over the years. While other Towns are 
going through the problems of having to downsize their 
services, Chelmsford is starting to rightsize it's services. 



154 



One of the plans was to strive to provide the same level of 
service that was in 1990, beginning with the public safety 
area. He was working towards the re-opening of the West 
Fire station. Some of the areas like Community service is 
still down by 5% from the 1990 figures. He talked about 
the projected revenue increases which will be used for 
funding. The Debt and Interest Area is decreasing this 
year. The miscellaneous receipts are level this year, 
however, the excise revenue is down. He then went 
through the budget and addressed areas that showed 
increases and decreases and explained the highlights. He 
started with the Municipal Administration. He explained 
that increases in the personnel service was due to additional 
staffing in order to comply with the charter, or to bring a 
department if there was a justifiable need closer to what it 
had in 1990. This was the case in his office and the Town 
Clerk's. He went on to the Educational Area. 
Chelmsford's share of the Nashoba Technical High School 
budget increased. The Chelmsford School Department is 
increasing $903,000.00 which is a 4% increase. He felt 
that additional State Aid will become available, if not then 
the School Committee will have to make decisions, and 
possibly come back to this body in the future requesting 
more money. Under Public Safety he indicated re-opening 
the West Fire Station and that the Police Budget does not 
include any raise for the Patrolman's union which is still 
under negotiations. David Carpenter questioned the 
concerns that the Finance Committee had about the 
availability of funds for re-opening the West Fire Station. 
The Town Manager explained it would require eight 
firefighters to staff the station and that there is $z00,000.00 
in the budget which will be more than enough to cover the 
cost. Due to the early retirement program and additional 
staffing of the West Station, fifteen newly hired people will 
start at the lowest rate on the scale. When asked the time 
frame for the re-opening, he said hopefully by late summer. 
The Department of Public Works expenses include 
Chelmsford's share of the cost of the Duck Island Sewage 
Treatment Plant. The Sewer Commission needed more 
money to defray the cost of legal fees and engineering fees 
for the Phase III of the Sewer Program. The Library 
increase reflects additional hours and staffing for the 
library, and the union negotiations are still going on. The 
Board of Health increases are due to salary costs mainly for 



155 



the increase of hours for the Nurse. This is due to lead 
paint and aid awareness programs that are required under 
state statute. Also the expenses changed due to the 
Inspectors using a fleet of vehicles that are now available 
instead of their own vehicles, therefore no more mileage 
will be paid. He projected an 10% increase in the 
employee benefits due to the early retirement initiative. 
The Non Exempt Debt is lower due to the paying off of the 
Cranberry Bog oond and the 1987 Capital Planning Bond. 
The Snow and Ice Account is overdrawn by $150,1)00.00, 
the last storm caused the budget to go out of balance by 
$80,000.00. After the State sends out the cherry sheet 
figures an adjustment may have to be made to this account 
at the October meeting. He felt that this was a fair budget 
and offered to answer any questions from the floor. 
George Merrill questioned why his taxes have increased 
continuously since 1988. It was explained that due to the 
number of overrides and sewerage bonds and the cutback in 
state aid has made it necessary for the property taxes to be 
increased to cover the additional costs over the budget 
voted in a given year. John Coppinger questioned the 
employees contracts. He wanted to know if the Town was 
at the point that the contracts can be funded without causing 
cuts in service or personnel of a particular budget. The 
Town Manager explained that if the money is not in the 
department's budget then the Department will have to come 
back to the Town Meeting and ask for more money, or an 
over-ride vote may be required. Edward Cady questioned 
if a department's budget was not voted would the personnel 
be cut in order to fund the increase in order to comply with 
a contract. The Town Manager explained that negotiations 
would have to be done all over again. If the funding is 
based on the result of the Town Meeting vote, or an 
override vote, and doesn't pass, then there is an obligation 
to continue on with negotiations, until an agreement is met. 
David McLachlan questioned under the Revenues, how 
much in tax dollars is the Town delinquent in collecting, 
compared to one year ago? Fred Mansfield the Finance 
Director /Tax Collector explained that the collections stayed 
basically the same from 1990 to 1993. Collections are 
about 97% complete at this current time, which reflects a 
one point four million delinquent. Also the Town Manager 
explained that Chelmsford's share of state aid is down oy 
four million. This is why the property taxes have been 



156 



having a steady increase in order to provide the same level 
of services. The Moderator asked if there were further 
questions. Hearing none he went on to explain that he was 
going to proceed through each of the shaded areas in the 
Finance Book and read the subtotal and total for each 
section then ask for any questions or discussion under the 
these areas. Barry Balan questioned if he could move the 
entire budget at this point. The Moderator explained that in 
order to avoid going through each line item, he would have 
to move the question, which would stop any further debate 
or discussion from taking place under this article. 
Therefore, Barry Balan moved the question. The 
Moderator again explained that no further questions would 
be allowed. The only questions that now could be asked 
were procedural ones questioning the motion to stop debate. 
He asked if there were any questions about stopping debate, 
hearing none he asked for a show of hands on the motion. 
This left the Chair in doubt, he asked for the following 
tellers to come forward and conduct an hand count: 
Dororthy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Jean 
Horgan. The result was Yes 106 No 31 2/3 's is 92, the 
motion carried. He then read the motion which included the 
figure needed to be raised and appropriated, and asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried. The budget reads as 
follows: 

(Note: see the discussion prior to Article 28 concerning 
the Finance Committee's recommendation) 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $45,996,159.00 to 
defray Town charges for the fiscal period July 1, 1993 to 
June 30, 1994. 

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION 

1 . Personnel Services $935,272 

2. Expenses $354,269 

3. Out-Of-State $4,500 

4. Outlay $5,500 

5. Legal Services $25,000 



TOTAL $1,324,541 



157 



EDUCATION 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

6. Total Budget $23,96! ,222 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECH HIGH SCHOOL 

7. Total Budget $490,129 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

8. Personnel Services $5,410,326 

9. Expense $413,205 

10. Out of State $3,600 

11. Outlay $25,500 



TOTAL $5,852,631 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

12. Personnel Services $990,392 

13. Expense $2,604,622 

14. Out of State $1,500 

15. Outlay $0 

16. Snow and Ice $350,000 



TOTAL $3,946,514 

SEWER COMMISSION 

17. Expense $60,000 

18. Out of State $0 



TOTAL $60,000 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

19. Personnel Services $157,093 

20. Expense $1,050 

21. Out-Of-State $500 

22. Outlay $4,000 



TOTAL $162,643 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

23. Personnel Services $293,956 

24. Expense $134,876 

TOTAL $428,832 



158 



LIBRARY 



25. Personnel Services S51 1,329 

26. Expense $181,733 

27. Out-Of-State $0 

28. Outlay $0 



TOTAL $693,072 

UNDISTRIBUTED EXPENSES 

29. Total Budget $4,554,373 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

30. Principal $4,020,000 

31. Interest $1,989,671 



TOTAL $6,009,671 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $47,483,628 

Reduced by: 

Sewer Offset Receipts - $484,969 

Art 2 1 Sewer Betterments - 

$1,000,000 
Art 23 Conservation fees - 

$2,500 



TOTAL RAISE AND APPROPRIATE-$45,996,159 

Samuel Poulten asked for a point of order. He wanted 
to know if there was any procedure for the recording of 
abstained voting during a required vote. He felt that it was 
obvious when a show of hands is asked that many 
representatives do not vote either way. The Moderator 
explained that there are three ways required when taking a 
vote under a motion. One is a majority, One is a 2'3's 
which would required a hand count if necessary, and the 
last is a roll call vote, which is where the abstention could 
be recorded. 



159 



The Moderator then read Article 28, and was 
informed by Town Counsel of a procedural point of 
order required for Article 26. He must ask the Finance 
Committee for their recommendation on the total 
budget figure of $45,996jl59.00. Cheryl Boss Chairman 
of the Finance Committee said that the Finance 
Committee recommended the figure. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained the Capital Budget article. The Board of 
Selectmen and the Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to appropriate the sum of $1,092,000.00 for the 
following capital projects. 



DEPARTMENT 

Library 

School 



Data Processing 
DPW 



Fire Department 



Police 



$1,092,000 



ITEM BUDGET 

McKay Handicap-$ 10,000 

Furniture-$24,000 
CHS Lockers-$15,000 
A/V - Computer-$22,000 
Byam Roo£$200,000 
CHS Exit Doors-$75,000 
McCarthy Locker-$ 15,000 
Lav Repair-$ 10.000 
HVAC Repair-fc0,000 
Int. Painting-$32,000 

Equipments 100,000 

Sidewalk Plow-$53,000 
Road Maint-$200,000 
Sidewalk-$ 100,000 
Truck w/Sander-$60,000 
Vehicles-$42,000 

Eng 1 Roof-$15,000 
Eng 3 Generator-$15,000 

Cruisers [4)-$64,000 
Furnace-$ 10,000 
Facility Study-$ 10,000 



160 



and to transfer the sum of $31,909.35 from unexpended 
bond proceeds under Article 8 of the 1990 Annual Town 
Meeting, transfer the sum of $16,830.57 from Article 9 of 
the 1991 Annual Town Meeting, transfer the sum of 
$7,514.76 from Article 16 of the 1992 Annual Town 
Meeting and borrow the sum of $1,035,744.40 to fund 
these obligations. 

Mary Frantz, member of the School Committee moved for 
reconsideration of Article 26. The figure under the School 
Department's budget was the Town Manager's figure and 
not the figure that the School Committee wanted. She felt 
that the School Committee should have a chance to present 
their requested figure. The Board of Selectmen were in 
favor or reconsidering the article. The Finance Committee 
felt that the School Committee should be heard. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
reconsider, which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came 
forward and an hand count was taken Yes 64 No 67, the 
motion was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Selectman Peter Lawlor 
moved to see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue the sum of $167,072.00 from Free Cash 
in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Before the Moderator adjourned the meeting, he 
made an announcement to the Body that Myra Silver who 
had been a member of the Finance Committee for many 
years is also leaving the Finance Committee and he thanked 
her for all of her work. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
the Moderator declared the meeting closed. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



161 



ANNUAL FALL TOWN MEETING 
October 18, 1993 



The Annual Fall Town Meeting was called to order 
at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, at 7:40 PM, 
by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 156 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator went over and explained the Town 
Meeting procedures, and pointed out the emergency exits 
located within the Auditorium. He then asked for a 
moment of silence in memory of town officials who had 
passed away since the April meeting. Bruce Knowles, 
member of the Commission on Disabilities who passed 
away July 17th, Martin Ames, former member of the 
School Committee, 1971-1974, and the Finance 
Committee, he died May 24th. Kenton Wells, former 
member of the Sinking Fund, 1971-1977, who died July 
8th. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, by 
show of hands. Selectman Lawlor moved that the reading 
of the warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, 
by show of hands. 

The Moderator announced that the following Non 
residents were present and with permission would address 
the Body if need be during the discussion of Article 5. 
James Hantzis, George Yannakopoulis, Ciro's Owners. 
John Sullivan, Architect Robert Murphy, Traffic 
Consultant, Robert Gill, Engineer. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

Selectman DeFreitas announced that at this time 
Senator Lucille Hicks and Representative Carol Cleven 
were present and wished to address the Body. Senator 
Hicks spoke about more money being made available from 
the State. Certain issues were being addressed and as a 
result programs where being created and funded. An 
example is the battered women issue, and how the Jane Doe 
Safety Fund program has received additional funding. 



162 



Representative Cleven spoke about the Motor Vehicle 
Registration Bill and the Re-Districting issue. Chelmsford 
is snort about 3000 people which would be needed in order 
to keep the Town under one district, there is a chance that a 
division may be made, however Senator Hicks and herself 
are in agreement that the Town should remain whole and 
are fighting together to keep Chelmsford under one district. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $9,917.00 with which to meet bills from 
previous years. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
amount represented insurance bills and public building bills 
that had come in after the closing of the fiscal year. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,230,733.00 in accordance with the Education 
Reform Act of 1993 to amend the FY 94 Budget by 
increasing Line Item 6, School Department. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the 
Town was receiving an additional $1.28 million dollars in 
state aid. There was no local tax money involved at this 

Soint, it was all state aid. He asked School Superintendent, 
>r Moser to come forward and explain. Dr Moser said the 
budget needed to be increased by $1.6 million dollars and 
basically there will be no actual improvement. The total 
budget will be $25,191,954. He gave a presentation listing 
the fixed cost increases of $937,000, additional positions 
cost of $547,000. The union personnel had settled with 
increases of 4%, 3%, and 2 IU %, over three years. 
$711,000 was the retroactive amount due to those who 
didn't receive any raises. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Edward 
Cady and Henry Emmett asked questions. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for further discussion, hearing 
none he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 



163 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $9,513.00 to amend the FY94 Budget by 
increasing Line Item 7 Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School to comply with the Town of Chelmsford's 
Minimum Contribution Level as set forth by the Education 
Reform Act for school districts in the Commonwealth. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is 
the increased amount in State aid due from the state. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Michael Sokol moved to waive the reading of 
Article 5. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion defeated. The Moderator then read the article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Christine Gleason, moved that 
the Town vote to amend the existing Town of Chelmsford 
Zoning Map by removing the following described property 
on Chelmsford Street and Watt Terrace from Neighborhood 
Commercial District (CA) and placing all of said property 
in a Shopping Center District (CC): 

PARCEL I 

The property described in a deed to David E. 
Merrill dated July 3rd, 1968 and recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1849 Page 639. 
Said property, according of the above-described deed, 
contains 24,825 square feet. 

The property is also identified as 285-287 
Chelmsford Street and shown as Map 112, Lots 13, 14, 16 
on the records of the Town of Chelmsford Board of 
Assessors. 

PARCEL II 

The property described in a deed to David E. 
Merrill and Helen M. Merrill dated October 1, 1987, and 
recorded at the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
at Book 4261 Page 168. Said property, according to the 
above described deed, contains 25,8j4 square feet. 

The property is also describe as 3 Watt Terrace 
and shown as Map 0012 Lot 15 on the records of the Town 
of Chelmsford Board of Assessors. 



164 



Attorney James Geary representing David Merrill 
explained that the property is presently zoned CA but it is 
surrounded by a CC zone and this would make it 
compatible to the area. Questions were asked concerning 
the traffic. Attorney Geary stated that a complete traffic 
study will be conducted. He was assured that curb cutting 
was possible. David McLachlan questioned if the 
prospective buyer was in fact Ciro's and not the Mall. 
Attorney Geary said that there was a pending purchase and 
sale agreement. David McLaughlin questioned if the 
property would be using town water and sewage. Yes it 
would be. John Carson questioned why the property next 
store was not included in the zoning change. This was due 
to different owners. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for the Planning Board's 
recommendation. Chairman Christine Gleason came forth 
and read the Board's recommendation: 

"The Planning Board held a Public Hearing on 
October 13, 1993 on the above mentioned article 
after advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford 
Independent on September 23 and 30, 1993, a 
minimum of 14 days before the hearing. A copy of 
the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 
5. At that meeting, the proponents residents and the 
Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning 
change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that 
the area described in the legal ad is currently 
discrepant with the rest of the surrounding area of 
Chelmsford Street. Therefore, in keeping consistent 
with the general intention of the Zoning By-laws for 
continuity in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted (5-0) to recommend an 
amendment to the Town of Chelmsford Zoning Map 
to remove the property on Chelmsford Street and 
Watt Terrace from (CA) Neighborhood Commercial 
District and place all of said property in a (CC) 
Shopping Center Commercial District. " 

Steve Hadley asked to defeat the article until the 
actual traffic study is complete, then make a decision. The 
Moderator attempted for an unanimous vote which failed. 



165 



A 2/3' s is needed because this is a change in zoning. The 
following tellers came forward and a hand count was 
conducted: Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy 
Simonian, Jean Horgan. Result: Yes 136 No 13 99 is 
2/3' s the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorized the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to convey in accordance 
with M.G.L. Chapter 30B, for consideration to be 
determined, all right, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town in a certain parcel of land on Monmouth Street 
shown as Lot 4 on Assessor's Map 114 containing 15,000 
square feet more or less and more fully described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North district Registry of Deeds 
in book 2539, Page 82. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
land will be put out for competitive bid, and will be sold 
for the maximum bid. The Finance Committee 

recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a voted by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator, Dennis McHugh, made a point of 
order. At this time he was appointing L)wight Haywood of 
the Finance Committee as Acting Moderator for this article. 
The Moderator stated that he had a direct conflict because 
he represents the North Water District from time to time, 
and Town Counsel James Harrington, represents the Town. 
Dwight Haywood came forward, and Town Clerk Mary 
St.Hilaire swore him in and the meeting proceeded. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 The Acting Moderator noted 
that the wording of the article is not the same as what is 
printed in the warrant book. The second paragraph had 
been eliminated and the what appeared as the third 
paragraph is now the second paragraph with additional 
wording at the end of it. He read the motion to the body: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that the Town 
vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen to place a non- 
binding referendum question on the April 1994 local 
election ballot asking the voters of the Town of Chelmsford 
if they support the filing of legislation in the State 






166 



Legislature to dissolved the three existing water districts in 
the Town of Chelmsford and to establish a water division 
within the Chelmsford Department of Public Works with 
water rates set by the Board of Selectmen, or their 
designee, provided that all water revenues including user 
fees De used for costs associated with the provision of water 
services or related construction and that any surplus of such 
revenue be utilized to reduce water rates. 

And further, the Board of Selectmen shall request 
the Town Manager to prepare and provide a report to the 
Town Meeting outlining the transitional issues of 
establishing a water division within the Department of 
Public Works including, but not limited to, proposed 
staffing, potential capital improvements, projected costs, 
projected savings, anticipated water rates and alternative 
rate setting options. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor noted that the Board of 
Selectmen unanimously voted to delete the second 
paragraph because this would force a time frame that they 
did not want to be bound to. He went on to explain that it 
was agreed with all the Water District Commissioners and 
the Board of Selectmen that the only way consolidation can 
take place is thru the process or petitioning the State 
Legislation. That Body is the only one who can create or 
dissolve water districts. The only real issue before the 
Body tonight, however, was not pro or con consolidation, 
but the decision to put this non-binding question on the 
ballot and it would not cost anything to do so. This would 
check the pulse of the Town. Everyone could vote their 
choice. He urged the Town Meeting Representatives to 
allow this process. Lorraine Lambert questioned the 
purpose of putting this issue on the ballot. She felt that this 
form of Government allowed the 162 Representatives to 
make decisions, that is why they are elected by the voters 
of their precincts, to represent them. Mary Frantz 
questioned what happened in 1988, wasn't this issued 
favorably voted? Selectman Lawlor explained that yes it 
was voted at the Town Election and at the Town Meeting to 
consolidate the water districts by way of petitioning 
legislation, however, for whatever the reason, the final step 
was never done to petition legislation. Numerous questions 
were asked about the effects and savings this would have on 
the Town as a whole. 



167 



It was questioned if the wording would be legal for a 
question on the ballot. James Harrington, Town Counsel 
confirmed that the wording was legal and could appear on 
the ballot. The Acting Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Acting Moderator opened 
the floor for discussion, and a lengthy discussion took 
place. Representatives spoke in favor of consolidation and 
to allow a question to appear on the April ballot. Questions 
were asked concerning the fact that the money received 
from the water fees could go towards other usages besides 
the water budget. Who would be responsible to making 
sure that the money raised in water rates would only be 
used to maintain the water service. Selectman Lawlor 
explained that this is the job of the Town Accountant. The 
Accountant makes sure that all money raised is accountable 
for. If accounts are only allowed to expend money for 
certain things then that is what will happen. Ronald 
Wetmore, Water Commissioner from the Center District 
gave a brief presentation showing the actual cost per gallon 
in each district and the expenses bored by each district. 
Dolores Blomgren expressed information regarding the 
survey done by the three districts. According to the survey 
the water takers did not want to be consolidated under the 
Town's DPW Department. A higher percentage of people 
responded to the survey than those who voted at the 
election when the issue was a ballot question. This should 
be an indication on how the Town s people felt. More 
discussion took place. Michael Sokol spoke against the 
Water Districts coming under the Town. He didn't want 
any money from the water fee's to be used down the road 
to supplement the school budget. He moved to amend the 
article by inserting between "to dissolved the three existing 
water districts in the Town of Chelmsford." and "within the 
Chelmsford Department of Public Works" the phrase 
"establish a consolidated municipal water district or to 
establish a water district" Insert after "to prepare and 
provide a report to the Town Meeting outlining the 
transitional issues of establishing" the phrase "a 
consolidated municipal water district or". And a second 
referendum question will be placed before the voters to 
establish one consolidated municipal water district. 



168 



He then explained the reasoning for his amendment. 
Michael McCall spoke in favor of the motion to amend. 
The Finance Committee recommended the amendment. 
The Board of Selectmen did not recommend the 
amendment. Bernard Lynch gave a brief history of the 
water consolidation issue. The Acting Moderator asked for 
a vote on the motion to amend. Motion defeated by a show 
of hands. Further discussion took place. Representatives 
spoke against the article. Tom Walsn questioned why after 
all this lengthy debate has no one really addressed the issue 
of putting the question on the ballot. He felt that the 
Representatives knew how they would vote personally, 
however the vote should be made based on placing the 
question on the ballot. Dennis Ready moved the question 
to stop debate. The Acting Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Acting Moderator then asked for vote 
by way of a show of hands on the article. This left the 
Chair in doubt, the following tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: 

Yes 68 No 74 The vote needed is a majority, the 
motion is defeated. 

Dennis McHugh resumed the Chair as Moderator 
and thanked Dwight Haywood for his efforts. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved to adjourned the 
Annual Town Meeting until 7:30 PM at the McCarthy 
Middle School Auditorium on Thursday October 21, 1993. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show 
of hands, motion carried unanimously. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:55 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



169 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL FALL 

TOWN MEETING 

October 21, 1993 



The Adjourned Town Meeting was called to order at 
the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, at 7:40 PM, by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 149 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved to recess the 
Annual Town Meeting until the conclusion of the Special 
Town Meeting. The Moderator asked for a vote by a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



17 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 21, 1993 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, at 7:41 PM, by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, by 
show of hands. Selectman Lawlor moved that the reading 
of the warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, 
by show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$12,500.00 from the sale of Graves and Lots to the 
Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund and vote to 
rescind Article 1 8 of the Spring Annual Town Meeting of 
1993. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that this 
is a standard article. The Finance Committee 

recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The motion carried, 

unanimously, by way of a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent 
domain, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and 
shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of Sewer Easements 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Phase IIIA Sewers, prepared 
for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission October, 1993" by 
Richard F. Kaminski and Associates, Inc., said plan to be 
presented at Town Meeting, for the purpose of constructing 
and maintaining Sewers, pumping stations, and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson 
explained that this is a standard article that is required in 
order to implement the ongoing Sewer project. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. 



171 



The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. A 2/3' s 
vote is needed. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in ree simple with 
the trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, for the property located in the Town of 
Chelmsford Massachusetts, and further described and 
shown on a set of plans entitled "land of Sidewalk 
Easement Davis Road, Chelmsford Ma prepared for the 
Town of Chelmsford October 1993, by Land Tech 
Consultants Inc., and "Plan of Sidewalk Easements North 
Road, Chelmsford, Ma prepared for the Town of 
Chelmsford October 1993" oy Land Tech Consultants Inc., 
and Plan of Sidewalk Easement Crooked Spring Road, 
Chelmsford Ma prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
October 1993:, by Land Tech Consultants Inc., and "Plan 
of Sidewalk Easements s Old Westford Road, Chelmsford 
Ma prepared for the town of Chelmsford, October 1993" 
by Land Tech Consultants Inc., said plans to be presented 
at Town Meeting, for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining sidewalks and all other appurtenances thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that in the 
past Capital Planning Money had been spent in studying the 
need for sidewalks located in a certain area. Now the 
project will begin, and this article allows the necessary 
action needed to proceed. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote, motion carried unanimously, 
by a show of hands. 

The Moderator declared seeing that there was no 
further business the Special Town Meeting was closed, and 
that he would return to the recessed Annual Town Meeting. 
The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting resumed at 7:57 
P.M. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved to withdraw this article. He explained that 
due to lack of communication on his part with the elected 
and appointed Town Boards on this article, he felt it was 
best to withdraw the article until detail explanation can be 
made regarding the purpose. 



172 



The Finance Committee was in favor of the motion 
to withdraw. The Board of Selectmen were also in favor. 
The Moderator asked for a vote, motion carried, 
unanimously, by a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen to sell pursuant to the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 30B 
Police Cruisers and Motorcycles and appropriate the 
sum of $30,000.00 from funds received from said sales 
towards the purchase of communication radios for the 
police department. 

Town Manager Lynch explained that presently there 
was scheduled to be sold seven cruisers and four 
motorcycles or dirt bikes. 

John Coppinger expressed concern of selling the 
motorcycles or dirt bikes. His neighborhood has had 
problems in the past with motorcycles or dirt bikes. When 
he called in a problem, he was told that due to lack of 
equipment the situation could not be pursued. Once the 
Police Department had acquired these motorcycles/dirt 
bikes the situation was able to be put under control. He 
felt if these items were sold, the problems would start 
again. Acting Police Chief Armand Caron came forth and 
explained that the reason for selling the equipment is due to 
lack of manpower. If the Manager would agree, one of the 
motorcycles could be kept and if the manpower is available, 
then the officer will be able to pursue the issue. The Town 
Manager agreed to look into the situation further, he was 
unaware that there was still a possibility of a need. He 
asked for permission to proceed with the passage of the 
article, and he and the Chief would certainly re-evaluate the 
need and see if it is justifiable, to keep one motorcycle. 
John Coppinger added that he would like to see the 
motorcycle manned. The Finance Committee 

recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The motion carried, 

unanimously, by a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 John Emerson moved to 
waive the reading of the article. Motion carried 
unanimously by a show of hands. Acting Chief Armand 
Caron, came forth and explained the article. He has a clerk 
who spends twenty-five hours a week working with the 
alarms. 



173 



There are over 500 house with alarms. This by-law is 
consistent with surrounding Cities and Towns. It will save 
time for the cruisers and will save money for the taxpayers. 
Dennis Ready asked if this list of alarm owners will be 
public. No it will not be. Sue Olsen asked if the position 
of Police Alarm Administrator will be a new position. No 
just a title given to the person already doing the work. Will 
this go into effect ninety days from tonight? No ninety 
days after the Attorney General approves the by-law. How 
will people know the by-law will oe in effect. A mailing 
will go out to all the present alarm owners listed. Notices 
will be place in the daily and local paper. Questions were 
asked about what constitutes a false alarm. Acting Chief 
Caron explained that if the Police arrive at a home and 
cannot find any source of evidence that indicates break-in 
or forced entry then that will be considered a false alarm. 
After the thircf false alarm to the same address a fine will be 
issued because the homeowner must be made responsible to 
find the source of the false alarm. In most cases it has been 
found that after three false alarms the source is usually 
faulty wiring. Many questions took place regarding the 
term "Proprietary System" 

Alarms that are directly tied into the Police Station are no 
longer allowed. The usual response is by way of a phone 
call from the alarm company to the switchboard after all the 
safeguards have been met that indicate the need for the 
Police. Car alarms are not covered under this by-law. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The Board 
of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked if there was any more need for questions, hearing 
none he opened the floor to hear deoate. Bradford 
Emerson moved the question to stop debate. Motion 
carried, unanimously, by a show of hands. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-law Article VI POLICE 
REGULATIONS by adding Section 23 Alarm Rules 
and By-Law Regulations as follows: 



174 



Section 23 ALARM RULES AND BY-LAW 

REGULATIONS 

SECTION 1 - DEFINITIONS 

A. Emergency Alarm System : The term "Emergency 
Alarm System" shall mean an assembly of equipment 
and devices, or a single device, arranged to signal a 
hazard or intrusion requiring urgent attention and to 
which police are expected to respond. In this By-Law, 
the term "Emergency Alarm System" shall include the 
terms, "Dial Alarm", "Direct Alarm", and "Local 
Alarm", as those terms are hereinafter defined. 

Fire alarm systems and alarm systems which monitor 
temperature, humidity, and any other conditions not 
directly related to the detection of an unauthorized 
intrusion into a premises, robbery or attempted 
robbery at a premises, are specifically excluded from 
the provisions of this By-Law. 

B. Alarm Installation : The term "Alarm Installation" shall 
refer to the design, installation, repair, alterations and 
maintenance of systems designed to cause alarm to be 
sounded in the event of a burglary or robbery. 

C. Person : The term "Person" shall refer to any natural 
person, corporation, unincorporated association, or 
other legal entity. 

D. Alarm User : The term "Alarm User" shall refer to any 
person on whose premises an alarm system is 
maintained with the Town of Chelmsford, except for 
alarm systems on motor vehicles or proprietary alarm 
systems. 

E. Proprietary System : The term "Proprietary System" 
shall mean all alarm systems sounding and/or 
recording alarm and supervisory signals at a control 
center located within the protected premises; the control 
center being under the supervision of the proprietor of 
the protected premises or nis employees or agents. If a 
proprietary alarm system includes a signal line 



17 5 



connected directly, or by means of a dialing device, 
to a central station or answering service, it thereby 
becomes an emergency alarm system as defined in 
this By-Law. 

F. Answering Service : The term "Answering Service" 
shall mean a telephone answering service which 
provides the service of receiving emergency signals 
from alarm systems, and thereafter immediately 
relaying the message by live voice to the Chelmsford 
Police Department. 

G. Central Alarm Station : The term "Central Alarm 
Station" shall mean any facility which is privately 
owned, that owns or leases alarm systems, whose 
facility is staffed by employees who receive, record, or 
validate alarm signals, and relay the information of 
such signals to the Chelmsford Police Department by 
any means. 

H. Dial Alarm : The term "Dial Alarm" shall mean an 
alarm system which automatically selects a telephone 
line connected to the Chelmsford Police Department 
and reproduces a prerecorded voice message or coded 
signal indicating the existence of an emergency 
situation that the alarm system is designed to detect. 

I. Direct Alarm : The term "Direct Alarm" shall mean any 
alarm system which is directly connected to the alarm 
processing unit within the police monitoring facility. 

J. Local Alarm : The term "Local Alarm" shall mean any 
alarm system which may, or may not be connected to a 
central station or answering service, which when 
activated, causes an audible and/or visual signaling 
device at the premises within which the alarm system is 
installed. 

K. Manual Alarm : The term "Manual Alarm" shall mean 
any alarm in which the activation of the alarm is 
initiated by the direct action of the alarm user, his 
agents, or employees, and is installed to elicit a police 
response to a burglary, attempted burglary, robbery or 
attempted robbery. 



17 6 



L. False Alarm : The term "False Alarm" means (1) the 
activation of an alarm system through mechanical 
failure, malfunction, improper installation, or 
negligence of the user of an alarm system or of his 
employees or agents; (2) any signal or oral 
communication transmitted to the Police Department 
requesting, requiring or resulting in a response on the 

Eart of the Police Department wnen, in fact, there has 
een no unauthorized intrusion or attempted 
unauthorized intrusion into a premises and no attempted 
robbery at a premises. Excluded from this definition 
are activation of alarm systems caused by power 
outages, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, or an 
alarm user who has no other means of eliciting an 
emergency response by the Police Department for valid 
emergency reasons. 

M. Town : The term "Town" shall mean the Town of 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

N. Police Department : The term "Police" or "Police 
Department shall mean the Town of Chelmsford 
Police Department, or any authorized agent thereof. 

O. Police Chief : The term "Police Chief" shall mean the 
Chief of Police of the Town of Chelmsford or his 
designated representative. 

P. Public Nuisance : The term "Public Nuisance" shall 
mean anything which annoys, injures, or endangers the 
comfort, repose, health or safety of any persons or any 
community or neighborhood. 

Q. Permit : The term "Permit" shall mean written 
permission, duly granted to an applicant by the Town 
upon payment of the required fee. 

R. Permit Year : The term "Permit Year" means a 12- 
month period, beginning January 1 and ending 
December 31 of each year. 

S. Police Alarm Administrator : The term "Police Alarm 
Administrator" shall mean an employee of the Town 
whose responsibility is to coordinate the administration 
and documentation of alarm businesses and alarm 
systems as it relates to the effective enforcement of the 
provisions of this chapter. 



177 



SECTION 2 - ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES 

Within ninety (90) days from the effective date of this By- 
Law, every "Alarm User" shall make application for a 
permit which shall be required to maintain and/or operate 
an "Emergency Alarm System" within the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

The Chief of Police is hereby authorized to issue a permit 
to any owner of property located within the Town of 
Chelmsford or the lesser thereof, to maintain, install and 
modify an alarm system upon application to him, and 
subject to the following provisions: 

A. The alarm user, applying for the permit, shall provide 
to the Chief of Police the name, address, and current 
telephone number of at least two persons for one family 
residences and three persons for all other property, who 
will be available at all times for the purpose of 
responding to alarms, by personally appearing at the 
building protected following an alarm or any kind. 

B. The Chief of Police, upon application to him for a 
permit, shall, in his sound judgement, determine 
whether the application conforms to the requirements of 
this By-Law, that the facts stated therein are true and 
accurate; and he may cause such system to be 
inspected, to determine whether such system is 
reasonably operational. 

C. All information obtained pursuant to this By-Law shall 
be kept confidential and shall be for the use of the 
Police Communications Center and the Police Alarm 
Administrator. 

D. It shall be the responsibility of the permit holder to 
keep all information necessary for proper notification, 
with the Police Communications Center/Police Alarm 
Administrator, current and up to date. 

E. A "Residential Permit" shall include all private 
dwellings, individual apartments, or condominium 
units, occupied primarily by the applicant, for which 
the applicant will pay to the Town of Chelmsford a 
permit fee of ten dollars ($10.00). The effective date 
will be January 1, 1994. Said effective date does not 
exempt the payment of said fee for previously installed 
systems. 



17 8 



F. A "Commercial Permit" shall include all businesses, 
corporations, or unincorporated associations for which 
the applicant will pay to the Town of Chelmsford a 
permit fee of fifteen dollars ($15.00). 

G. All federal, state, county, or local government agencies 
who operate alarm systems shall be exempt from all 
permit fees and services charges, but shall comply with 
all other requirements of this By-Law, and with all 
requests of the Chief of Police, as shall concern the 
operation of their alarm systems. 

H. All persons 65 years of age or older who are the 
principal occupant of the private residence listed on the 
application, shall also be exempt from all permit fees, 
but shall comply with all other requirements of this By- 
Law. 

I. Applications for the renewal of an alarm user's permit 
shall be made every year within 30 days immediately 
preceding January 1 , and shall be accompanied by a 
non-refundable fee of ten dollars ($10.00) for each 
application in behalf of a residential building and fifteen 
dollars ($15.00) for each application in behalf of a non- 
residential building. 

J. A twenty-five dollar ($25.00) late charge will be 
charged in addition to the fees provided above, to an 
alarm user who is more than sixty (60) days delinquent 
in renewing a permit. 

K. All alarm users to whom a permit has been issued, 
shall keep the permit within the protected premises for 
which the permit was issued. 

L. Any alarm permit issued under this By-Law shall be 
made available for inspection, suspension, or 
revocation purposes, upon the demand of any 
authorized Chelmsford Police Officer. 

M. Failure to comply with any of the provisions of this 
By-Law may constitute grounds for the Chief of Police 
to deny the issuance of a permit, or suspend/revoke an 
existing permit. 



17 9 



SECTION 3 - CONTROL AND CURTAILMENT OF 
FALSE ALARMS 

A. No alarm system designed to transmit emergency 
messages through relay to the Police Department shall 
be worked on, tested or demonstrated without notifying 
and obtaining permission from the Police Chief. 
Permission is not required to test or demonstrate alarm 
devices not transmitting emergency messages through 
relay to the Police Department. An unauthorized test 
constitutes a false alarm. 

B. If in the event of any alarm, the Police 
Communications Center is unable to notify any listed 
representative of the alarm user, or if a representative 
or the alarm user fails to appear at the building 
protected within thirty (30) minutes after notification, 
the Police Communications Center shall not respond to 
any further alarms from that system until the alarm is 
reset by the alarm user or, in the case of a defective 
alarm system, until the alarm system has been repaired. 

Whenever a representative of an alarm user fails to 
appear at the building protected, following an alarm 
within thirty (30) minutes after being notified by the 
Police Communications Center, the alarm user shall 
pay a charge of ten dollars ($10.00) in addition to 
any service charge assessed, for every such event, to 
the Town of Chelmsford. Violation of the provisions 
of this sub-section is sufficient cause for 
suspension/revocation of the Emergency Alarm 
System Permit required by Section 2 of the code of 
the Town of Chelmsford. 

C. Any user of an alarm system, which transmits false 
alarms requiring a response from the Chelmsford 
Police Department, shall be assessed a service charge 
of twenty five dollars ($25.00) for each false alarm in 
excess of three (3) occurring within a thirty (30) day 
period. 

Fees: 

Third false alarm within a 30 day period - $25.00 

Fourth 

False alarm within a 30 day period -$50.00 

Fifth & subsequent false alarm within a 30 day period 

- $100.00 



180 



All service charges assessed hereunder shall be paid 
through the Police Alarm Administrator to the Town 
of Chelmsford Treasurer for deposit into the General 
Fund. Upon failure of an alarm user to pay the 
assigned service charge within thirty (30) days, a five 
dollar ($5.00) late fee shall be assessed and the total 
amount shall be payable within fifteen (15) days. 
Failure to remit payment due, within a total of forty- 
five (45) days from original notice shall result in the 
Chief of Police ordering the permit (for the premises 
recording the false alarm) revoked. Any such 
revocation shall be effectuate within ten (10) days 
from the date of mailing of the Police Chief's order. 

D. After the Police Department has recorded three (3) 
separate false alarms within a calendar year from a 
particular alarm system, the Police Chief shall notify 
the alarm user, in writing of such fact and require said 
alarm user to submit, within ten (10) days after receipt 
of said notice, a report describing efforts to discover 
and eliminate the cause(s) of the raise alarms. If the 
alarm user, on the basis of absence from the Town, or 
on any other reasonable basis, requests an extension of 
time for filing the report, the Police Chief may extend 
the ten (10) day period for a reasonable time. If the 
said alarm user fails to submit such a report within ten 
(10) days or within any such extended period, the 
Police Chief may order the alarm permit (for the 
premises recording the three (3) false alarms) 
suspended until the alarm system is made to function 
properly. Any such order of suspension shall be 
preceded by a written notice of intent to the alarm user 
by the Police Chief. Any such suspension shall be 
effectuated ten HO) days from the date of mailing of 
the Police Chief s notice, if no hearing is requested. 

E. In the event that the Police Chief determines that a 
report submitted is unsatisfactory or the alarm user has 
failed to show by the report that he has taken or will 
take reasonable steps to eliminate or reduce false 
alarms, then the Police Chief shall order the alarm 



181 



permit (for the premises recording the three (3) false 
alarms) suspended until the alarm system is made to 
function properly. Any such order of suspension 
shall be preceded by a written notice of intent to the 
alarm user by the Police Chief. Any such suspension 
shall be effectuated within ten (10) days from the date 
of mailing of the Chief's order. 

F. In the event that the Police Department records five (5) 
false alarms within a calendar year from a particular 
alarm system, the Police Chief may order the permit 
for saici alarm system be suspended for a period of not 
less than six (6) months from the date the alarm system 
is disconnected. Any such order of suspension shall be 
preceded by a written notice of intent to the alarm user 
by the Police Chief. Any such suspension shall be 
effectuated within ten (10) days from the date of 
mailing of the Police Chief's order. 

G. Upon receipt of a notice of intent to revoke or suspend 
an alarm user's permit, pursuant to this By-Law, the 
alarm user may, within five (5) days of such receipt, 
submit a written request for a hearing before the Chief 
of Police or his designee, setting forth the reasons why 
the permit should not be revoked or suspended. 

H. At the hearing before the Chief of Police or his 
designee, the holder of the permit shall have the right 
to present evidence, cross-examine witnesses and to oe 
represented by counsel. Such a hearing shall be 
informal and shall not be subject to the rules of 
evidence or formal courtroom procedure. After the 
hearing, the Chief of Police or his designee may either 
issue an order of revocation, withdraw the notice of 
revocation, or suspend the permit until such time that 
he is satisfied that the cause (or causes) of the false 
alarms has (or have) been eliminated. 

I. Any alarm user who has, in accordance with this 
section, had their alarm permit revoked/suspended by 
the Police Chief may appeal the order of 
revocation/suspension to the Board of Selectmen. An 
appeal shall be filed within five (5) days of the date of 
the order of revocation/suspension. 



182 



Thereafter, the Board shall consider the merits of the 
appeal, and in connection therewith shall hear 
evidence presented by all parties concerned. After 
hearing such evidence the Board may affirm, vacate, 
or modify the order of revocation/suspension. 

J. An alarm user whose permit has been revoked, is not 
precluded under this By-Law from applying for a new 
permit unless he is satisfied that the user's system has 
been properly services and its deficiencies corrected. 
The Chief of Police may also impose reasonable 
restrictions and conditions upon the user before issuing 
a new permit. (These restrictions and/or conditions 
shall appear on the permit and shall provide for 
automatic revocation occurrence of two (2) false alarms 
in the remaining permit year.) 

K. Any alarm user, central station, answering service or 
proprietary system, who does not possess an alarm 
user's permit, or whose permit has been suspended, 
revoked or denied, transmits by any means to the 
Chelmsford Police Department an alarm signal from 
their respective system, shall be charged a twenty-five 
dollar ($25.00) service fee for each signal eliciting a 
response from the Police. This service fee shall be 
separate from any fines which may be assessed by the 
Court upon a finding of a violation of this By-Law. 

L. Any alarm user, owner, or lessee who possess an alarm 
user's permit may appeal false alarm service charges in 
writing to the Chief of Police within ten (10) days after 
receipt of the notice of penalty. 

M. The Chief of Police or his designee may waive 
assessment of the service charge, when, in his 
judgement, reasonable attempts are being taken to 
discover and eliminate the cause of the false alarm. 

N. Any alarm user who, after having a permit revoked and 
after exhausting his right to a hearing, fails to 
disconnect his alarm system, shall be guilty of a 
violation, and upon conviction, shall be fined not less 
than one hundred dollars ($100.00). 



183 



SECTION 4 - ABATEMENT OF NUISANCE ALARMS 

A. All alarm systems as defined in this By-Law which 
make or sound an audible signal which may be heard 
outside of the protected premises, shall be equipped 
with a device which shall limit the duration of such 
audible signal to not more than twenty (20) minutes. 

B. Any alarm system emitting a continuous and 
uninterrupted audible signal for more than twenty (20) 
minutes between 7:00 P.M. and 7:00 A.M. wnich 
cannot be shut off, reset or otherwise curtailed due to 
the absence of unavailability of the alarm user or those 
persons designated by him and which disturb the peace, 
comfort or repose or a community, a neighborhood, or 
inhabitants of the area where the alarm system is 
located, shall constitute a public nuisance. Upon 
receiving complaints regarding such a continuous and 
uninterrupted audible signal, the Police 
Communications Center shall endeavor to contact the 
alarm user, or members of the alarm user's family, or 
those persons designated by the alarm user in an effort 
to abate the nuisance. The Police Chief shall cause to 
be recorded the names and addresses of all 
complainants and the time each complaint was made. 

C. In the event that the Police Chief is unable to contact 
the alarm user, or members of the alarm user's family, 
or those persons designated by the alarm user or if the 
aforesaid persons cannot or will not curtail the audible 
signal being emitted by the alarm system and if the 
Police Chief is otherwise unable to abate the nuisance, 
he may direct a Police Officer or a Fire Fighter or a 
qualified alarm technician to enter upon the property, 
outside the home or building in which the alarm system 
is located and take any reasonable action necessary to 
abate the nuisance. 

D. If entry upon property outside the home or building in 
which the alarm system is located is made in 
accordance with this section, the person so entering 
upon such property: (1) shall be considered lawfully 
present but may not conduct any search, seizure, 



184 



inspection, or investigation while he is upon the 
property; and (2) shall not cause any unnecessary 
damage to the alarm system or to any part of the 
home or building; and (3) shall leave the property 
immediately after the audible signal has ceasea. 
After an entry upon property has been made in 
accordance with this section, the Police Chief shall 
have the property secured, if necessary. The 
reasonable costs and expenses of abating a nuisance 
in accordance with this section may be assessed to the 
alarm user, said assessment not to exceed expenses 
incurred by the Town. 

E. Within ten (10) days after abatement of a nuisance in 
accordance witn this section the alarm user may 
request a hearing before the Chief of Police and may 
present evidence showing that the signal emitted by his 
alarm system was not public nuisance at the time of the 
abatement; that unnecessary damage was caused to his 
property in the course of the abatement; that the costs 
of the abatement should not be assessed to him; or that 
the requirements of this section were not fulfilled. The 
Chief shall hear all interested parties and may, in his 
discretion, reimburse the alarm user for the repairs to 
his property necessitated by the abatement, or excuse 
the alarm user from paying the costs of the abatement. 

SECTION 5 - ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAM 

The Chief of Police shall establish a written procedure for 
the administration and enforcement of the provisions of this 
By-Law. 

In January of each year the Chief of Police shall submit a 
report to the Town Manager regarding the effectiveness of 
this By-Law and any recommendations thereon. 

The Police Department of the Town of Chelmsford shall 
take every reasonable precaution to assure that the alarm 
signals and alarm messages received by the Police 
Department are given appropriate attention and are acted 
upon with dispatch. Nevertheless, the Police Department 
shall not be liable for any defects in the operation of alarm 
devices, for any failure or neglect to respond appropriately 



185 



upon receipt of an alarm from such source, nor for the 
failure or neglect of any person or in connection with the 
installation and operation of alarm systems or their 
components, the transmission of alarm signals and 
prerecorded messages, or the relaying of such signals and 
messages. In the event that the Police Department finds it 
necessary to disconnect an alarm device after exhausting all 
other provisions of the By-Law, the Police Department 
shall incur no liability by such action. 

SECTION 6 - ALARMS NOT ALLOWED 

Dial alarms and direct alarms are not allowed. 

SECTION 7 - PENALTIES 

It shall be unlawful for any person or alarm user to 
maintain or operate an alarm system, as defined by the 
terms of this By-Law, without first obtaining a permit as 
provided. 

Any person or alarm user who does maintain or operate an 
alarm system without a permit shall be guilty of a violation, 
and upon conviction, shall be fined not less than fifty 
dollars ($50.00). 

Any alarm user who, after having a permit 
suspended/revoked and after exhausting their right to a 
hearing, fails to disconnect the alarm system, shall be 
guilty of a violation, and upon conviction, shall be fined 
not less than one hundred dollars ($100.00). 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 1 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate from the 1991 Transportation Bond Issue as set 
forth in Chapter 33 of the Acts of 1991, the sum of 
$479,646.00 for the purpose of Chapter 90 expenditures. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
Chapter 90 money is money received from the State for 
road reconstruction and resufacing projects. This article is 
similar to the one that appeared on the spring warrant. 
This is the second installment from the 1991 Bond issue. 
This approval is needed in order to access the money at 
State level in order to comply with State and Federal laws. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 



186 



The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Town Manager Lynch gave 
a presentation to the Town Meeting Body indicating the 
need to exempt the Chief of Police from Civil Service. 
The Town accepted Civil Service for its Police Chief and 
Police Department in 1944, and has been operating the 
same way since. In 1978 a management study of the Police 
Department was done. This was called the Sheehan 
Report. The Report looked at the Department's strengths 
and weaknesses and recommended changes to be made in 
order to make the Department more professional on it's law 
and order approach and crime prevention. It's purpose was 
to eliminate any possible problems in the future. The 
report indicated that once appointed through the Civil 
Service System, the Chief of Police maintains the position 
until death or retirement. The report recommended that 
once the incumbent Chief completes his service then a 
national search be conducted for his successor. The Town 
Manager explained that currently there is no removal 
process available. If this position was removed from the 
Civil Service System then the Town Manager would be 
allowed to appoint an individual when need oe or dismiss 
an individual if an unsatisfactory job was being done. He 
would most likely follow many of the guidelines of the 
Civil Service process in his selection but he would expand 
the qualifications requirements, require assessment 
evaluation. He gave a list of forty-eight cities and towns 
that have exempted the Chief of Police from the Civil 
Service process. One hundred and eight communities out of 
three hundred and fifty-one cities and towns have Police 
Chiefs under Civil Service. According to some information 
he had, nation wide 2/3 's of the Police Chiefs are under 
Civil Service, however, he feels that the percentage is 
really the Police Departments themselves not the Chief. He 
does not want to take the Police Department out of Civil 
Service, just the Manager of the Department, which is the 
Chief. He cited that there are a number of flaws in the 
current Civil Service process. Three years ago the system 
was scaled down. Once there were two hundred workers, 
now there is less than one hundred. There are only two 
people who are qualified and designated to deal with tne 



187 



examination of all public safety personnel both in the Fire 
and Police Departments, plus the one hundred and eight 
Police Chiefs. Currently there are two types of exams, 
Promotional which allows those within the department to 
apply. And Open, which allows any one within the State of 
Ma to apply. In either case only the top three people are 
selected and put on a list from which the choice is made. 
Sometimes people receive higher marks by being allowed 
extra points due to being an veteran. It could take up to one 
year to fill the position through this process. He feels that 
the Civil Service way of choosing is not necessarily in the 
best interest of the Town. He asked for support of the 
article. 

A number of questions were asked. How many 
other management positions are under Civil Service? This 
is the only one. who would be responsible for the removal 
of a Chief? The Town Manager is, he appoints and 
removes. When the Town Manager makes this 
appointment or any other according to the Charter the 
Board of Selectmen have two weeks to veto the 
appointment, or they can approve it. What would the 
grounds be for dismissal? The Town Manger explained 
that the individual would have a contract, and within the 
contract would be the grounds for dismissal and the process 
for dismissal. Scott Ubele wanted to know of the forty 
eight town's shown that now have an appointed Police 
Chief, if any consultation had been made in regards to 
morale within the ranks of the Police Department. The 
Town Manager explained that he either spolce to the actual 
appointed Chief or the Manager. Dennis Ready wanted to 
know how the salary would be determined. The salary 
would be based on the present classification plan in effect 
based on the level of responsibilities etc. Wnat would be 
the cost for the nation wide search. The Town Manager 
estimated that the cost for the advertisement would run 
between $500.00 to $L000.00. The assessment evaluation 
could be $3,000.00 to $4,000.00. Plus if anyone comes in 
from out of Town there is the cost of hotel rooms. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen supported the article. Edward Marshall spoke 
in favor of the article, he felt that accountability was a big 
factor. John Emerson voted to amend the article by 
deleting 2 and insert the following: 



188 



Section 2. The provisions of Section One shall not impair 
the Civil Service status of any rank below the rank of 
Police Chief. 

Add a new section 3 and 4 as follows: 

Section 3. The Town Manager shall provide an 
employment contract with any person appointed to the 
Office of Police Chief for a period not to exceed three 
years. 

Section 4. The Town Manager, prior to making a search 
for candidates for the office of Police Chief shall consider 
qualified applicants from the uniformed members of the 
Chelmsford Police Department who shall have served no 
less than three years. 

Change the present section 3 to read section 5. 

John Emerson then explained his reason for the 
amendments. The Finance Committee was not in favor of 
the motion to amend. The Board of Selectmen and Town 
Manager Bernard Lynch were in favor of the motion to 
amend. It was questioned if someone could hold Civil 
Service status and be Police Chief. Yes, however, there 
was a time factor of only five years on hold. After that the 
person has to start all over again. Bradford Emerson 
moved to amend the amendment by changing in John 
Emerson's section 4 the word three years to six years. He 
felt that the person should have six years of experience on 
the force in order to be considered. The Finance Committee 
recommended the motion to amend the motion. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the motion to amend the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. More discussion took place. 
Sergeant James Murphy expressed the Superior Officers 
view on the article, and asked that the position not be 
removed from Civil Service, he asked that the article be 
defeated. Jacob Sartz spoke against the article. Barry Balan 
moved to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for a 
show of hands on the motion as amended, motion carried, 
unanimously. More discussion took place on the main 
motion as amended. Dennis Ready spoke in favor of the 
article as amended. Scott Ubele, President of the Police 
Union spoke against the article, the morale of the union 
members should be considered. 



189 



The Officers will be affected the most. He asked the Body 
to vote against it. Paul Gleason spoke in favor. Selectman 
Richard DeFreitas spoke in favor. Samuel Poulten spoke 
against the article. Susan Gates questioned why did the 
union take a vote of confidence against the past Chief if 
they knew that under Civil Service he couldn't be 
dismissed? Wouldn't they've been better off if the Town 
Manager could have stepped in, maybe the situation could 
have been alleviated? Philip Currier moved the question to 
stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the article as amended. Motion carried, and the article 
reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the filing of special legislation with 
the General Court of Massachusetts to exempt the positions 
of police chief from the provisions of chapter thirty-one of 
the General Laws as follows: 

An Act Exempting the Position of Chief of 
Police of Chelmsford from Civil Service" Be it enacted by 
the General Court of Massachusetts, 

Section 1. The position of police chief in the Town of 
Chelmsford shall be exempt from the provisions of chapter 
thirty-one of the General Laws. 

Section 2. The provisions of Section One shall not impair 
the Civil Service status of any rank below the rank of 
Police Chief. 

Section 3. The Town Manager shall provide an 
employment contract with any person appointed to the 
Office of Police Chief for a period not to exceed three 
years. 

Section 4. The Town Manager, prior to making a search 
for candidates for the office of Police Chief shall consider 
qualified applicants from the uniformed members of the 
Chelmsford Police Department who shall have served no 
less than six years. 

Section 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Edward Cady moved to reconsider Article 10. He 
felt that more explanation was needed before passing the 
by-law. 



190 



The Finance Committee was not in favor of 
reconsideration. The Board of Selectmen were not in favor 
of reconsidering. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 John P. Emerson Jr, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission Betterment Assessments and Sewer Privilege 
Fees dated September 8, 1986, revised April 1988 and 
April 23, 1990 by adding the following section: 

5.4 Sewer Connection Charge 

The Commission shall assess a sewer connection 
charge to the owners of land abutting a sewer line owned 
by the Town of Chelmsford for those properties that cannot 
be assessed a sewer betterment or privilege fee. This 
charge shall be made in lieu of a betterment assessment or 
privilege fee in an amount equal to the amount that would 
have been assessed under either Section 3 or Section 5, 
whichever is deemed appropriate by the Commission. 

Sewer connection charges shall be levied at the time 
of connection to the public sewer system. Section 4.2 and 

4.5 of these regulations shall govern a property owner's 
method of payment. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John P. 
Emerson explained that right now the State only allows the 
Sewer Commission to charge for privilege fees and 
betterment fees. This would allow the Sewer Commission 
to charge connection fees on privately installed sewer 
extension lines. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for the need or further discussion, hearing 
none, he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Thomas Firth moved that the 
Town vote to see if the Town of Chelmsford will accept 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 
41 A which currently permits local assessors to grant total 
or partial deferrals from real estate taxes to persons 65 or 
older, providing they have signed a "tax deferral and 
recovery" agreement with the municipality, and have 
qualifying gross receipts from all sources of not more than 
$40,000.0(1 



191 



Sandra Hall petitioner of the article explained that 
currently the town allows for deferrals, however the income 
figure is $20,000. She felt that $40,000.00 was an 
reasonable income, but if the article would be amended to 
read $30,000. or $35,000. that would be acceptable. She 
felt that there was a definite need for some type of increase. 
Questions were asked concerning the effect this would 
have. It was explained that once a deferral is signed the 
property owner's would not have to pay any real estate 
taxes until the house is sold. A lien is placed on the 
property and there is an 8 % interest charge for each year 
owed in back taxes. It is a State law that the accrued taxes 
due can not exceed 50% the value of the house. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. Chairman Dwight Haywood stated that 
the Committee had no recommendation at this time. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 (allow in-law apartments in 
all residential districts of Chelmsford.) The Moderator 
asked if the petitioner Catherine Vessie was present? No 
one came forward. He then explained that due to having 
no signed motion on this article, no action could be taken. 
The article was going to be dismissed. He also noted that 
Town Counsel had advise him even if the motion was 
signed, the article was contradictory and it would not be 
allowed to be acted on unless a re-draft was submitted. 
Selectmen Peter Lawlor moved to dismiss the article. 
Motion carried unanimously by a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue the sum of $248,072.00 from Free Cash 
in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

Town Manager Lynch, explained that this reflects a 
savings in the Solia Waste Program from last year and will 
be used to reduce taxes. It represents a $20.00 reduction in 
taxes. Bill Dalton question if the books are balanced and 
closed out, if not then how could this be done? The Town 
Manager said they were, and that the Town has a certified 
free cash number from tne Department of Revenue. 



192 



Dwight Haywood, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
said that the Town couldn't be free cash certified unless the 
books are closed. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. Chairman Dwight 

Haywood, stated that the Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article, however, people should be aware that the 
Town is not taxing up to it's levy limit, because of this, the 
State would regard the Town as being a wealthy 
community. The Board of Selectmen recommended the 
article. James Sousa stated perhaps the money could be 
used for an capital expenditure item, the Town is ducking 
the tax levy issue and that this issue should be looked at in 
the future. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
the Moderator moved to adjourned the meeting sine die. 
Motion carried unanimously. The Meeting adjourned at 
10:40 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



193 




OFFICE OF THK TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

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FORM AVAILABLE AT TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to 

Town Committees 

Appointed Town Officials 7 

Board of Appeals 89 

Board of Health 19 

Board of Registrars 18 

Board of Selectmen 1 1 

Celebrations Committee 90 

Cemetery Commission 31 

Central Mass. Mosquito Control District 23 

Commission on Disabilities 91 

Conservation Commission 92 

Council on Aging 94 

Cultural Council 97 
Department of Public Works 

- Engineering Division 25 

- Highway Division 26 

- Parks Division 28 

- Public Buildings Division 29 

- Sewer Division 30 
Dog Officer 48 
Elected Officials 5 
Emergency Management 98 
Finance Committee 99 
Finance Department 

- Accounting 33 

- Assessors 34 

- Data Processing 35 

- Treasurer 36 
Fire Department 37 
General Information 1 
Historical District Commission 101 
Holiday Decorating Committee 102 
Housing Authority 104 
Inspections Department 49 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School 86 
Personnel Board 106 
Planning Board 107 
Police Department 40 



INDEX 

Page 

Police Auxiliary 46 

Public Libraries 50 

Recreation Commission 1 10 

Sewer Commission 112 

School Committee 55 

- Principal-High School 59 

- Principal-McCarthy Middle School 60 

- Student/Community Services 62 

- Guidance Department 63 

- Data Processing 66 

- English Department - 6-8 67 

- English Department - 9-12 68 

- Fine Arts Department 70 

- Foreign Languages Department - 7-12 72 

- Mathematics Department - 6-8 73 

- Mathematics Department - 9-12 74 

- Reading Department - K-12 75 

- Science Department - 6-8 77 

- Science Department - 9-12 78 

- Social Studies Department - 6-8 80 

- Social Studies Department - 9-12 81 

- Health & Physical Education 82 

- Athletics 83 

- Special Education 84 
Solid Waste Advisory Committee 117 
Town Clerk 17 
Town Meetings and Elections 

- Warrant for Annual Town Election - April 6, 1993 122 

- Results of Annual Town Election - April 6, 1993 124 

- Annual Town Meeting - April 26, 1993 129 

- Special Town Meeting - April 29, 1993 144 

- Annual Town Meeting - October 18, 1993 162 

- Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - October 21 , 1993 170 

- Special Town Meeting - October 21 , 1993 171 
Representative Town Meeting Members 8 
Town Directory 2 
Town Manager 14 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 120 
Veterans' Services 119 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1480 00255 3284 



Not to be taken 




"Disabled individuals requiring auxiliary aides to fully 
benefit from the Town of Chelmsford's programs should 
contact the Personnel Coordinator at 250-5201 . It is 
necessary to give the request at least one week in 
advance."